Tag Archive for student groups

Wesleyan’s Vocal Talent Showcased at Stone A Cappella Concert

Once called the “singing college of New England,” Wesleyan still boasts strong musical traditions. On Nov. 5, multiple student groups performed at the 7th Annual Stone A Cappella Concert held in Memorial Chapel. The concert, held in conjunction with Homecoming/Family Weekend, provides an extraordinary showcase of the vocal talent and stage presence of Wesleyan undergraduates.

The performance is sponsored by the Charles B. Stone Jr. A Cappella Fund, which was established through the generosity of Sarah Stone Maynard ’79, P’11 and Fred Maynard ’80, P’11. It honors of Sarah’s father, Chip Stone ’49, P’79, P’82, GP’11, GP’15, and celebrates the Stone family’s long Wesleyan legacy.

Photos of the concert are below: (Photos by Caroline Kravitz ’19 and Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Student Groups Fair Showcases Wesleyan’s Broad Range of Organizations

Hundreds of Wesleyan students attended the Student Groups Fair, Sept. 22.

On Sept. 22, the Wesleyan Student Assembly hosted its 27th annual Student Groups Fair on Andrus Field. The event provides an opportunity for students to meet with representatives of both new and established groups and network with university departments who provide annual programs.

Wesleyan is home to more than 250 student organizations under the categories of activism, identity, sports, publications, visual arts, independent projects, the Office of Community Service and more. Groups include Wesleyan’s pro-Israel political activism group, Cardinals for Israel; the Wesleyan Boxing Club; PINOY, the Filipino Student Association; the Basal Gang, a club for people interested in neuroscience and mental health; Hui Hula O Na Lei Kukui, a hula dance group; Veg Out, a campaign aiming to increase awareness of the social, political, and environmental consequences of animal agriculture; Kumina, a group that celebrating traditional dances passed on by ancestors; and more. View the list of all student groups on campus.

Photos of the Student Groups Fair are below: (Photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Shakti is a student organization devoted to promoting cultural awareness amongst South Asians and the greater Wesleyan community. Members of the group pride themselves in promoting inclusivity and educating their peers.

Shakti is a student organization devoted to promoting cultural awareness amongst South Asians and the greater Wesleyan community. Members of the group pride themselves in promoting inclusivity and educating their peers.

Wesleyan Student Assembly Hosts Student Groups Fair

The Wesleyan Student Assembly hosted the 25th annual Student Groups Fair Sept. 16 on Andrus Field. The campus-wide event provided an opportunity for all students to learn about new and established student groups, network with different academic departments, and interact with vendors from the local Middletown community.

The Wesleyan Student Assembly hosted the 25th annual Student Groups Fair Sept. 16 on Andrus Field. The campus-wide event provided an opportunity for all students to learn about new and established student groups, network with different academic departments, and interact with vendors from the local Middletown community. Wesleyan boasts more than 250 clubs and student groups.

Throw Culture is Wesleyan's mixed ultimate frisbee team. The group has regular practices to prepare for tournaments throughout the year. The team is an open space for everyone to come play and learn ultimate.

Throw Culture is Wesleyan’s mixed ultimate frisbee team. The group has regular practices to prepare for tournaments throughout the year. The team is an open space for everyone to come play and learn ultimate.

Wesleyan Refugee Project Aids Refugees from around the World

Cole Phillips ’16, center, and Sophie Zinser ’16, right, volunteer every week at Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS) in New Haven, helping refugees apply for housing and energy subsidy programs. Here, they are pictured with Ramez al-Darwish, a Syrian refugee from Homs.

Cole Phillips ’16, center, and Sophie Zinser ’16, right, volunteer every week at Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS) in New Haven, helping refugees apply for housing and energy subsidy programs. Here, they are pictured with Ramez al-Darwish, a Syrian refugee from Homs.

The world is currently facing the largest refugee crisis since World War II. Concerned Wesleyan students are volunteering with community organizations, coordinating various speaker panels, fundraising for international NGOs and agencies, and engaging in advocacy efforts.

This fall, Casey Smith ’17 and Cole Phillips ’16 founded the Wesleyan Refugee Project (WRP). Smith, a College of Social Studies major who is pursuing certificates in Middle Eastern studies and international relations, has worked with refugees since high school, advocated for refugees’ rights in Washington, D.C., and volunteered for refugee resettlement organizations. She is currently studying abroad in Jordan, where she helps refugees access legal services with the International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP) and teaches yoga at the Collateral Repair Project (CRP). Phillips is a government major pursuing certificates in Middle Eastern studies and international relations. While studying abroad in Jordan, he worked for CRP, an NGO that provides aid to Syrian and Iraqi refugees. Phillips then returned to Jordan in August via a Davenport grant to conduct research for his thesis, and grew close with a Syrian refugee with whom he worked as an interpreter. These experiences inspired Smith and Phillips to engage the Wesleyan community in refugee aid work.

“More broadly, we also wanted to start conversations and bring awareness about refugee issues to campus,” said Smith.

Currently, there are 34 Wesleyan students volunteering through WRP, and many more have expressed interest. Every week, student volunteers work with three different organizations: Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS), helping refugees apply for housing and energy subsidy programs; the International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP), working on refugees’ resettlement applications; and Paper Airplanes, tutoring Syrian refugees in English.

WSA Hosts Student Groups Fair

The Wesleyan Student Assembly hosted the 24th Annual Student Groups Fair Sept. 18 on Andrus Field. The event provided students with an opportunity to meet with both new and established groups. The annual fair also offered students a chance to network with multiple school departments who provide a variety of programs every year. (Photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry '19)

The Wesleyan Student Assembly hosted the 24th Annual Student Groups Fair Sept. 18 on Andrus Field. The event provided students with an opportunity to meet with both new and established groups. The annual fair also offered students a chance to network with multiple school departments who provide a variety of programs every year. (Photos by Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Wesleyan Advocates for Gender Equality.

Wesleyan Advocates for Gender Equality.

Wesleyan Club Soccer.

Wesleyan Club Soccer.

Milk and Choreo.

Milk and Choreo.

Co-Ed Ultimate Frisbee.

Co-Ed Ultimate Frisbee.

Outreach.

Outreach.

Hip-Hop Dance Collective.

Hip-Hop Dance Collective.

Ajua: Latino Student Association.

Ajua: Latino Student Association.

 

Relay for Life.

Relay for Life.

Explore all student groups on campus here.

Schwartz ’17 Founder of Wesleyan Radio Control/ Drone Club

David Schwartz '17, founder and president of the Wesleyan Radio Control/ Drone Club, flies a drone behind South College July 28. He's also on Wesleyan's ski team, rock climbing team and sailing team. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

David Schwartz ’17, founder and president of the Wesleyan Radio Control/ Drone Club, flies a drone behind South College July 28. He’s also on Wesleyan’s ski team, rock climbing team and sailing team. (Photo by Olivia Drake)

In this News @ Wesleyan story, we speak with David Schwartz from the Class of 2017.

Q: David, where are you from and what is your major?

A: I grew up in Amherst, Mass. When I first came to Wesleyan, I walked around wearing my Amherst sweatshirt for awhile before realizing there was a bit of a rivalry. I’m an Economics and Government double major, with a minor in data analysis. I’m particularly interested in applying “big data” techniques to government policymaking.

David Schwartz operates the DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ drone "that was very user-friendly and intuitive to learn," he said.

David Schwartz operates the DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ drone “that was very user-friendly and intuitive to learn,” he said.

Q: You are founder and president of the Wesleyan Radio Control/ Drone Club. How did your interest in aerial photography begin?

A: I’ve always had a passion for flying, but unfortunately I get air-sick in small planes, so I’ve been able to apply my interest by being involved in the radio control community. Last summer, I spent my free time building an aerial photography quad copter and coding a basic auto-pilot system. For example, if the gyroscope was leaning left, the program would simply instruct the servos (motor) controlling the ailerons (parts on the wings that tilt the plane) to counter this movement until the plane was stable again. When I was able to stabilize the aircraft, I noticed that the camera on it was able to take some really clear photographs.

Q: Why did you decide to start the club? How many members do you have?

A: After telling my friends about my project building a drone last summer

WSA Hosts 21st Annual Student Groups Fair

The Wesleyan Student Assembly (WSA) hosted the 21st Annual Student Groups Fair Sept. 12 behind Usdan University Center.

The campus-wide event allowed both new and returning students to learn about new and established student groups, network with different academic departments and interact with several vendors from the local Middletown community. About 70 student groups were represented at the event.

Photos of the event are below: (Photos by Harry Jiang ’18)

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Lubeck ’14 Co-Organizes Wesleyan Co-op to Provide Local, Sustainable Food

Jon Lubeck '14  is the co-founder of Wesleyan's Local Food Co-op Organization, which provides locally-sourced cheese, bread, meat, coffee, vegetables and other goods from various farms throughout Connecticut and southern Massachusetts.

Jon Lubeck ’14 is the co-founder of Wesleyan’s Local Food Co-op Organization, which provides locally-sourced cheese, bread, meat, coffee, vegetables and other goods from various farms in Connecticut, New York and southern Massachusetts.

In this issue of The Wesleyan Connection, we speak with Jon Lubeck ’14 from the Class of 2014.

Q: Jon, what are you majoring in and what attracted you to Wesleyan?

A: I am majoring in anthropology and am currently in the process of writing my senior thesis. Wesleyan first piqued my interest when I had a class in high school with a super-inspiring history teacher who was a Wes graduate. When I visited the school, I loved the small, liberal arts atmosphere, the active arts and music scene on campus, and the history of active student organizing. Wesleyan seemed like a place to me where students were passionate about things that mattered to them, whether it was art, academics, music, political activism, food, etc. I wanted to be surrounded by passionate, excited people, and am so happy that I have the chance to be now!

From left, Jon Lubeck, prepares a meal with co-op co-organizers Scott Zimmer '14 and Will Curran-Groome '14.

From left, Jon Lubeck, prepares a meal with co-op co-organizers Scott Zimmer ’14 and Will Curran-Groome ’14. (Photos by Hannah Norman ’16)

Q: You’re currently a member and co-founder of Wesleyan’s Local Food Co-op Organization that provides an affordable option for students to purchase local and sustainable food. Tell us more about the group and why you got started?

A: The Wesleyan Local Food Co-op has a long history behind it. It was started during my sophomore year by Cathryn Herlihey ’12, who was unsatisfied with the meal plan options offered by Bon Appetit. She felt like there was no option for her to purchase locally grown and ethically raised products (since then, Bon Appetit  has begun to offer some great options at Usdan and Weshop). The Co-op started with around 20 members who were friends of hers and allowed to join this pilot program. Soon after, we started actively organizing it ourselves, buying more kinds of foods, and quickly expanded. We now have nearly 600 members, including faculty and staff for the first time this semester. We have plans next year to expand to Middletown residents and offer subsidized shares to participants on various forms of food aid: SNAP and EBT benefits and the Woman Infants and Children program. We are in the process of applying for grants and positions to administrate this new incarnation.

Along with Will Curran-Groome ’14 and Scott Zimmer ’14, I am in charge of organizing and administrating the Co-op. We all became involved very early on in the Co-op’s history, and really found the work we did fulfilling. As a student-led and administered group, we strive to incorporate as many members as possible in the decision-making and administration

170 Student Groups Represented at Fair

The Fall 2013 Student Groups Fair took place Sept. 13 inside the Spurrier-Snyder Rink at the Freeman Athletic Center. About 170 student groups were represented. The event was sponsored by the Wesleyan Student Assembly and the WSA Office. Photos of the event are below:

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10 Students Tend 2 Acres at Wesleyan’s Long Lane Farm

Students learn about sustainable agriculture at Long Lane Farm.

Students learn about sustainable agriculture at Long Lane Farm.

While their classmates spend the summer growing business contacts at off-campus internships, 10 Wesleyan students hope to cultivate something equally lucrative – sustainable agriculture.

The “dirt in the nails” days are long but satisfying at Wesleyan’s Long Lane Organic Farm, a student-run organic farm that gives students a place to experiment and learn about sustainable agriculture. Sustainable agriculture integrates three main goals – environmental health, economic profitability, and social and economic equity.

Johnson is one of 10 student farmers working at Long Lane this summer. After graduating, Johnson hopes to study astrophysics and ultimately become an astronaut.

Coady Johnson ’15 harvests radishes at Long Lane Farm this summer. After graduating, Johnson hopes to study astrophysics and ultimately become an astronaut.

This summer, the students are cultivating two acres of land, the biggest plot they’ve ever farmed. They’re growing cucumbers, radishes, tomatoes, tomatillos, squash, asparagus, basil, broccoli, lettuce, blueberries and much more. They’re also building a second hoop house, similar to a greenhouse, which will allow the students to grow leafy greens, peppers and other crops during the fall and winter months.

Not all students have a farming background. Summer farmer Coady Johnson ’15 grew up an hour north of Chicago in Wadsworth, Ill. where “most of the surrounding area is cornfields, but even so I didn’t get involved in farming until coming to Wesleyan,” he said.

At Wesleyan, Johnson fell in with a group of people who inspired him to think about the state of food production and consumption in this country.

“Industrial farming and a disconnect between what we eat and how it is produced is hurting our well-being, and I think that the best way to remedy that is to educate myself and others on growing our own food in a more responsible and sustainable way.”

A day down on the farm begins at 7 a.m. with a morning meeting . There, the students discuss plans for work, “like whether or not we should companion plant radishes with the squash. We try to be horizontally organized and make decisions only with 100 percent consensus, so that everyone can have a say in what we’re doing, and can suggest new ideas if they want,” Johnson said.

The students work until 11 a.m. and take a midday heat break. During time, the farmers run errands and do other work for the farm that can be done in the field, like emails and budget spreadsheets. At 3 p.m., the students return to the fields and work until 7 p.m. The farmers also choose to participate in various building projects such as planning and building the mass irrigation system.

Jessup Smith ’14 and nine other Wesleyan students enrolled in the Architecture II course designed and built a new chicken coop for Long Lane Farm.

Jessup Smith ’14 and nine other Wesleyan students enrolled in the Architecture II course designed and built a new chicken coop for Long Lane Farm. Pictured, Smith is crawling through the coop’s exterior entryway.

Food harvested from the farm is sold at the North End Farmers’ Market throughout the summer, and at the Wesleyan Farmers’ Market during the academic year. The student farmers donate excess food to Amazing Grace Food Pantry in Middletown, and have an arrangement through which Bon Appetít dining services funds positions for students to work on the farm in exchange for weekly deliveries of farm vegetables. In addition, the students invite local families to the farm and teach children about the various aspects of farming and producing food. Children are sent home with a bag of produce that they personally harvested.

Next fall, a flock of feathery friends will join the students at the farm. A newly-designed and installed chicken coop will enable the farmers to harvest local eggs for use at Usdan University Center. Learn more about the coop in this Wesleyan Connection article.

The summer farmers are Laura Cohen ’14, Kate Enright ’15, Coady Johnson ’15, Ben Guilmette ’15, Josh Krugman ’14, Maggie Masselli ’16, Anna Redgrave ’16, Rebecca Sokol ’15, Hailey Sowden ’15 and Cat Walsh ’16. And they’re always looking for extra working hands.

“Whoever wants to help is a farmer, and we’re always looking for new people, from Wesleyan or from Middletown at large,” Johnson said.

Learn more about the farm’s

Photos of the farm are below:

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