12 search results for "anthony price"

Venture by Price ’20 Wins 2019 Changemaker Challenge

Anthony Price

Anthony Price

Be the Change Venture (BCV), a nonprofit organization founded and led by Anthony Price ’20, has been chosen as a 2019 Changemaker Challenge Winner by T-Mobile and Ashoka.

BCV was one of 30 winners selected from 300 applicants for the Ashoka-T-Mobile Changemaker Challenge, a yearly prize that supports young changemakers across the United States and Puerto Rico.

BCV aims to train and empower young people to be workforce-ready. It works with youth aged 14 to 18 to help them develop soft and practical skills, find and obtain internship and job opportunities, and foster professional relationships with various career experts. The organization operates in the Lincoln, Neb., and Cleveland, Ohio, areas.

As challenge winners, Price and one team member have been invited to attend the T-Mobile Changemaker Lab, held in Seattle on February 19­–21, with all expenses paid.

Price’s Civic Engagement Work Supported by Newman Civic Fellowship

Anthony Price '20

Anthony Price ’20 will begin a Newman Civic Fellowship next fall.

For his efforts in demonstrating the potential for effective long-term civic engagement, Anthony Price ’20 was invited to participate in Campus Compact’s 2019 Newman Civic Fellowship. He will have access to exclusive virtual and in-person learning opportunities during the 2019–2020 academic year for the duration of the one-year fellowship term.

The Newman Civic Fellowship recognizes and supports community-committed students who are changemakers and public problem-solvers at Campus Compact member institutions. Price joins 261 student fellows representing Campus Compact member colleges and universities from 41 states; Washington, D.C.; Mexico; and Greece.

Price, a government and American studies double major, is the founder and executive director of Be The Change Venture, a Cleveland-based nonprofit that teaches young people networking skills to support their career development. He also spent a full semester in Washington, D.C., with the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s Emerging Leaders Program (see article). Price returned back to the Capitol this summer working for New Jersey Senator, Cory Booker, in the United States Senate. He also served as one of the executive core-planning members for the TedXWesleyan U conference.

“I look forward to being a part of an amazing cohort, building lifelong relationships, and learning from other change agents who are also on the ground serving others,” Price said. “[The fellowship] will be essential for my own civic engagement work serving young people in both inner city and rural communities that tend to get overlooked.”

Wesleyan President Michael Roth nominated Price for the fellowship.

“[Anthony has an] inspiring talent for civic engagement and an admirable dedication to making our society more equitable,” Roth wrote. “At Wesleyan, Anthony has consistently sought opportunities to collaborate with peers and community members on projects with social impact, from organizing a pitch competition for local high school and college students to joining our Nonprofit Board Residency program. As someone who seeks out opportunities to improve his skills in building relationships across sectors and industries, Anthony has held internships with various organizations, ranging from the Cleveland Cavaliers to the Office of U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown.”

As a Newman Fellow, Price receives training and resources that nurture his passions and help develop strategies for social change. He’s able to participate in virtual events focused on skill development and professional learning; present papers at Campus Compact conferences; receive one-on-one leadership development mentoring; and connect and network with other engaged student leaders.

Although the fellowship doesn’t begin until fall, Price has already had conversations with his mentor and attorney Rudhir Krishtel, regarding Price’s nonprofit work. The connection was made through Wesleyan’s Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship.

“Rudhir already has played a pivotal role in thinking about how I want to expand upon the impact my team and I have made while at the same time remaining committed to civic engagement work long-term. Specifically, he has advised me on a few things I’m considering pursuing—law school, Fulbright, or perhaps working on Capitol Hill, and staying civically engaged,” Price said. “Overall, I’ve already gotten a head start in crafting the scope of my fellowship months in advance before the fall conference.”

The Newman Civic Fellowship was created in honor of Frank Newman, one of Campus Compact’s founders and a tireless advocate for the role of higher education in preparing students for active and engaged citizenship. The Newman Civic Fellowship is generously supported by the KPMG Foundation and Newman’s Own Foundation.

The 2019 Newman Civic Fellows National Convening will take place in November 2019, in Boston.

“There I’ll meet other fellows and learn about the work they’re doing in communities across the country,” Price said. “I’m looking forward to it!”

After graduation, Price aspires to be a cross-sector change agent, focused in particular on low-income communities. He plans to become an attorney, using the power of the law and policy to address the root causes of inequity in American society.

Members of the Class of 2019 Inducted into Phi Beta Kappa

PBK

On May 25, members of the Class of 2019 were inducted into Wesleyan’s Gamma Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa Society, the oldest national scholastic honor society. The Wesleyan Gamma Chapter was organized in 1845 and is the ninth-oldest chapter in the country.

To be elected, a student must first have been nominated by the department of his or her major. The student also must have demonstrated curricular breadth by having met the General Education Expectations and must have achieved a GPA of 93 and above.

Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest surviving Greek letter society in America, founded in December 1776 by five students who attended the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. The emblem contains the three Greek letters “Phi-Beta-Kappa,” which are the initials of the Greek motto, Philosophia Biou Kybernetes. This essentially means “the love of wisdom is the guide of life.”

The spring 2019 inductees are:

Caroline Adams
Yulia Alexandr
Erin Angell
William Bellamy
Cara Bendich
Zachary Bennett
Chiara Bercu
Sophie Brett-Chin
Nicholas Byers
David Cabanero
Talia Cohen
John Cote 

Students Celebrate 2018-19 Leadership Prizes, Fellowships, Scholarships at Reception

Edelina Marzouk '19 won an Outstanding Collaboration Award and a Scott Biomedical Prize for demonstrating excellence and interest in commencing a career in academic or applied medicine. Emma Distler '19 won the Scott Prize-Italian for excellence in modern languages. Jordan Legaspi '19 won a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Award.

Edelina Marzouk ’19 won an Outstanding Collaboration Award and a Scott Biomedical Prize for demonstrating excellence and interest in commencing a career in academic or applied medicine. Emma Distler ’19 won the Scott Prize-Italian for excellence in modern languages. Jordan Legaspi ’19 won a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Award.

On May 8, the Office of Student Affairs hosted a reception honoring students who received academic or leadership prizes, fellowships, and scholarships in 2018–19.

More than 315 students and recent alumni received one of the University’s 180 prizes. (View the list below or on the Student Affairs website.)

Scholarships, fellowships, and leadership prizes are granted to students and student organizations based on criteria established for each prize or award. Certain University prizes are administered by the Student Affairs/Deans’ Office, while others are administered by the Office of Student Activities and Leadership Development (SALD).

7 Prominent Speakers Share Ideas at 2nd Annual TEDxWesleyanU

Members of the 2019 TEDxWesleyanU team gathered on the TEDx stage in Beckham Hall following the successful conference. Tickets for the event sold out within 12 hours.

Members of the 2019 TEDxWesleyanU team gathered on the TEDx stage in Beckham Hall following the successful conference. Tickets for the event sold out within 12 hours.

On April 27, seven prominent thought leaders including Wesleyan alumni, two medical doctors, and local politicians shared their ideas during the second annual TEDxWesleyanU Conference held in Beckham Hall.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. 

Students Receive Innovation Fund Grants from the Jewett Center for Community Partnerships

Musical Mentor Henry Hodder ‘20 works with two of his guitar students at Oddfellows Playhouse in Middletown.

Musical mentor Henry Hodder ’20 works with two of his guitar students at Oddfellows Playhouse in Middletown. Hodder’s group, Cardinal Kids, is one of nine student ventures to receive grants from the JCPP Student Innovation Fund.

This spring, nine student ventures received grants from the Jewett Center for Community Partnerships (JCCP) Student Innovation Fund. These student efforts are representative of the JCCP’s commitment to cocreate mutually respectful partnerships in pursuit of a just, equitable, and sustainable future for communities beyond the campus—nearby and around the world.

The Student Innovation Fund provides up to $750 for spring or summer projects that prioritize:

  • Collaboration between student groups, faculty/staff, and/or community partners.
  • Investigation of the impact of our civic engagement efforts.
  • Sharing of ideas and learnings in civic engagement on campus and beyond.

The recipients are:

Jessica Brandon ’20 and Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19
Adolescent Sexual Health Awareness (ASHA)

Due to the structural forms of racism that economically oppress people of color, volunteer opportunities are inherently restrictive. ASHA’s innovation seeks to investigate this barrier to the involvement of students of color in volunteer opportunities, as it is essential to the project of cultural competency for an educational organization to include members that represent the identities of many different students. The Student Innovation Fund will support their effort to make ASHA an inclusive and equitable organization.

5 Students Attend Clinton Global Initiative University Conference in Chicago

Katie Shewfelt '20, Makaela Kingsley '98, Anthony Price '20, Momi Afelin '19, Frederick Corpuz '20 and Ferdinand Quayson '20 attended the 11th annual Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U) conference, held Oct. 19-21 in Chicago, Ill.

Katie Shewfelt ’20, Makaela Kingsley ’98, Anthony Price ’20, Momi Afelin ’19, Frederick Corpuz ’20, and Ferdinand Quayson ’20 attended the 11th annual Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U) conference, held Oct. 19-21 in Chicago, Ill.

While 94 percent of children from wealthy Filipino households attend high school, only 69 percent from poor households continue to get a high school education after graduating from grade school (UNESCO).

Through a nonprofit venture called SALIN Ed., Frederick Corpuz ’20 is working to create an inexpensive, sustainable alternative to classroom learning that enables 10- to 12-year-olds in the Philippines to become independent, successful learners through an online program.

To advance his social entrepreneurial skills and better his venture, Corpuz applied to participate in the 11th annual Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U) conference, held Oct. 19–21 in Chicago, Ill.

Students Organize TEDxWesleyanU, Host Distinguished Speakers

At left, Anthony Price '20, Zoe Reifel '21, Thafir Elzofri '19, Eunes Harun '20, Melisa Olgun '20 and Leo Merturi '20 thank the audience for attending Wesleyan's TEDxWesleyanU event on April 7.

At left, Anthony Price ’20, Zoe Reifel ’21, Thafir Elzofri ’19, Eunes Harun ’20, Melisa Olgun ’20, and Leo Merturi ’20 thank the audience for attending Wesleyan’s TEDxWesleyanU event on April 7. The entire event was organized by students.

Nationally known leaders and distinguished Wesleyan alumni and faculty presented short, powerful talks during the inaugural TEDxWesleyanU event April 7 in the Ring Family Performing Arts Hall.

Launched in 2009, TEDx is a program of locally organized events that bring the community together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TED Talks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection. Some of the best talks from TEDx events have gone on to be featured on TED.com and garnered millions of views from audiences across the globe.

Speakers included Maria Santana ’98, a correspondent for CNN en Español; Connecticut State Representative Matthew Lesser ’10; Middletown Mayor Dan Drew; National Geographic photographer Michael Yamashita ’71; national radio host Angela Yee ’97, and others. (View photos of the speakers below this article. View bios of all 13 speakers here.)

Melisa Olgun '20 and Eunes Harun ’20 stand outside the Ring Family Performing Arts Hall while preparing for TEDxWesleyanU.

Melisa Olgun ’20 and Eunes Harun ’20 stand outside the Ring Family Performing Arts Hall while preparing for TEDxWesleyanU.

“The current political climate is characterized by the lack of conversations taking place between people of opposing sides and viewpoints. TEDxWesleyanU is the launchpad we need to kickstart an unprecedented level of dialogue,” said Eunes Harun ’20, who spearheaded the event. “The TEDx mission and Wesleyan’s values align so heavily in the fostering of ideas and sparking dialogue. This event further emphasizes how Wesleyan is at the forefront of confronting current political and social issues in an effort to ultimately make the world a better place.”

Harun came up with the idea to host a TEDx event after tossing off ideas to his roommate, Alex Harold ’20, and neighbor Leo Merturi ’20. The tri-founders soon created a TEDxWesleyanU core team including Melisa Olgun ’20; Anthony Price ’20, and Thafir Elzofri ’19. Zoe Reifel ’21, who organized a TEDx event as a high school student, joined the team late to offer her experiences and input. Collaboratively, the group spent more than a year-and-a-half planning the inaugural event, which “has been one of the most impactful learning experiences of my life,” Harun said.

Price ’20 Spends Spring Semester in D.C. as a Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Intern

Anthony Price ’20, pictured here by the Washington Monument in Washington D.C., is half-way through a five-month internship on Capitol Hill.

Anthony Price ’20, pictured here by the Washington Monument in Washington D.C., is half-way through a five-month internship on Capitol Hill. “The internship will be a huge asset to the rest of my studies at Wesleyan and it’s a huge stepping stone to help me pursue a career in public service, or perhaps on the Hill,” he said.

As a Congressional Black Caucus Foundation intern, Anthony Price ’20 is spending the spring semester working on Capitol Hill, where he is learning about governing institutions and the inner workings of the U.S. Congress.

The CBCF’s internship programs “prepare college students and young professionals to become principled leaders, skilled policy analysts and informed advocates by exposing them to the processes that develop national policies and implement them—from Capitol Hill to federal field offices. Program participants receive housing, a stipend, office placements, and opportunities to meet and interact with professional legislators and leaders working in all branches of government.”

“Thus far, I’ve enhanced my leadership, adaptability and writing skills immensely,” Price said. “At the end of the program, I know I will have a better understanding of our American legislative process and the work that’s being done day-to-day within the branches of Congress.”

Kadets, Kwon, Williams, Reyes Deliver Senior Voices, Hatch Gives Faculty Reflection

Lili Kadets ’17, Haneah Kwon ’17, Arnelle Williams ’17, and Mika Reyes ’17 delivered “Senior Voices” addresses on May 27 in Memorial Chapel. Anthony Hatch, assistant professor of science in society, assistant professor of sociology, assistant professor of African American studies, delivered the faculty reflection. Below are the text of their speeches:

Patricelli Center Fellows Celebrate Year-Long Pilot Program

The 2016-17 Patricelli Center Fellows jumped for joy during their end-of-the-year celebration on May 9.

The 2016-17 Patricelli Center Fellows jumped for joy during their end-of-the-year celebration on May 9. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

In Fall 2016, the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship launched a for-credit, cohort-style, project-based fellowship program (CSPL 264 and 265) for 36 students. And on May 9, the fellows celebrated the success of the pilot program during a group lunch and discussion.

stu_patricelli_2017-0509111055Among the fellows are Alexandra Bacchus ’17, who is working to create a platform for day laborers to connect with potential employers in a safe and trustworthy way to combat job insecurity and low pay.

Nebiyu Daniel ’18 is expanding health education in his hometown of Garamuleta, Ethiopia through his organization, Rural Access.

Iraqi refugee Ahmed Badr ’20 is using the power of storytelling to empower youth worldwide through his creative expression platform, narratio.org.

Shantelle Brown ’19 is empowering adolescent Jamaican girls to deconstruct violent and oppressive cultural norms through sisterhood and creative expression.

Etenish Abebe ’17, Jamilia Simon ’17 and Aliya Lyons ’17 are building a user-centered two-sided marketplace to connect freelance hairstylists to clients.

Joshua Nodiff ’19 is creating a nonprofit called Power To The People that seeks to implement energy democracy through urban environmental design.

Through his enterprise, Be The Change Venture, Anthony Price ’20 is connecting Cleveland’s youth and empowering them to be leaders in their community.

Learn more about all the fellows online.

The Patricelli Center is accepting applications for the 2017/2018 Fellowship. For more information, visit bit.ly/patricelli-fellowship.

Lim Delivers “Senior Voices” Baccalaureate Address

Elvin Lim

Elvin Lim

Elvin Lim, associate professor of government, presented the following remarks during the “Senior Voices” baccalaureate address on May 25:

As we gather today to commemorate the last four years of our seniors’ career at Wesleyan, perhaps some of you are feeling some trepidation about your futures outside of this ivory tower. So I have decided to direct my remarks today on the subject of contingency, and the human reaction to it, uncertainty, which is the source of all our hopes and fears.

Plato had said that in order to understand the nature of justice, we must first observe its incarnations in just republics. So I shall try to do the same in my effort to understand contingency. Perhaps if we analyzed how civilizations have coped with uncertainty, we may better understand how we, as individuals, can cope with uncertainty. I will propose that the collective solution for uncertainty – stamping it out – is exactly opposite to the individual solution: embracing it.

So how did ancient, or pre-modern societies cope with uncertainty? Quite simply, they defined it away. And they did it in two ways. The Pagan religions tended to characterize the Gods as crazy. Contingency came in the form of the capricious Gods. The Judeo-Christian religions went the other way. They understood their God to be all-knowing and omnipotent. Since God was all-knowing, there was no contingency. We may not know what is to come, but God does. This can be encapsulated in the common phrase, “everything happens for a reason.” That was how we coped with uncertainty.