Tag Archive for international

Chanoff ’94 Receives Schwab Foundation/World Economic Forum Social Entrepreneur of the Year Award

The Schwab Foundation/World Economic Forum Social Entrepreneurs of the Year are RefugePoint founder and executive director, Sasha Chanoff ’94 (right), and Amy Slaughter, chief strategy officer for the organization.

Sasha Chanoff ’94, founder and executive director of RefugePoint, and Amy Slaughter, the organization’s chief strategy officer, were named Schwab Foundation/World Economic Forum Social Entrepreneurs of the Year. This honor is bestowed each year by the Schwab Foundation, the World Economic Forum’s sister organization, to identify and recognize the world’s leading social entrepreneurs.

As awardees, Chanoff and Slaughter join the Schwab Foundation’s global community of social entrepreneurs working in more than 70 countries. They will be integrated into World Economic Forum meetings and initiatives and invited to contribute in exchanges with top leaders in business, government, civil society, and media.

Makaela Kingsley ’98, director of the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship, calls Chanoff “one of the alumni whom we, at the Patricelli Center, look to for inspiration. He has a unique ability to see opportunity in dire situations and the tenacity to pursue that opportunity relentlessly. For Wesleyan students who are passionate about creating social change, Sasha is a true role model.”

Tyner ’13 Named Fulbright National Geographic Storytelling Fellow

William Tyner ’13 is headed to Romania on a year-long Fulbright National Geographic Fellowship. He will create an immersive film documenting the civic-tech group, Code for Romania.

William Tyner ’13 was awarded a Fulbright National Geographic Storytelling Fellowship —one of only five of such grants awarded each year

The fellowship is made possible through a partnership between the U.S. Department of State and the National Geographic Society and is a component of the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. It provides opportunities for U.S. citizens to participate in an academic year of overseas travel and storytelling on a globally significant theme.

Tyner, who majored in anthropology at Wesleyan and enjoyed courses in the College of Film and the Moving Image, will be working with Code for Romania. He’ll be creating a documentary series that will explore Romania’s civic technology community.

“’Civic tech’ is a nascent field in which local ‘hacktivists’ use technology to deepen democracy and increase civic engagement,” he explained in his application.

Tyner notes that he has been affiliated with Codes for America, an organization that focuses on technology as a pathway to modernize government, make it more accessible—but he wanted “to observe civic tech as a social movement, from a sociological perspective.”

Romania, he says, will be the perfect place for his lens: “Their civic tech community is emerging within a historically unique anti-corruption movement. I’m going to chronicle a story of people taking action and control in their community.”

Miranda ’02 up for Moana Grammy, Receives Special Latin Grammy Award

Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02, here in a still from the official video for “Almost Like Praying,” which he wrote and recorded with a number of other artists to benefit hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico. He recently was honored at the Latin Grammy Awards and has been nominated for a Grammy Award for a song he wrote for Disney’s Moana.

Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02, the Pulitzer Prize winner, MacArthur Genius, and Tony Award winner for Hamilton and In the Heights was honored with the Latin Recording Academy President’s Merit Award at the 18th annual Latin Grammy Awards on Nov. 16. This is a special award, not given annually, and it was presented to the well known composer, lyricist, and performer by Latin Recording Academy President/CEO Gabriel Abaro to honor Miranda’s many outstanding contributions to the Latin community.

Abaroa told  Billboard, “Lin-Manuel’s urban and social poetry have provided strength and encouragement to every Latino motivated to get ahead. He has brought pride to our community by reminding us of the resilience and fortitude we demonstrate on a daily basis.”

Most recently he composed and released “Almost Like Praying—Relief Single for Puerto Rico, (Atlantic Records, Oct. 6, 2017). Miranda, who performed the song with various artists, donated all proceeds to The Hispanic Federation’s UNIDOS Disaster Relief Fund to help the survivors of Hurricane Maria

Additionally, when the Grammy nominations were released on Nov. 28, Lin-Manuel Miranda’s work appeared in two categories, both related to his work on the soundtrack for Moana, Disney’s animated adventure-comedy. Moana: The Songs, a compilation of works by various artists, including Miranda as singer and performer, appears in the category of Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media. Additionally, a song he wrote for that film, “How Far I’ll Go” (performed by Auli’i Cravalho), appears in the Best Song Written For Visual Media category.

In an interview with Hollywood Reporter Melinda Newman, Miranda explained that the insight into creating “How Far..” for the title character of the film came in recalling his own teenage years:

Where she [Moana] and I met was having a calling — not necessarily even understanding the calling, but knowing that it’s there inside. I knew I wanted a life in some creative endeavor for as long as I can remember. For me, I think the song took the final turn it needed when I realized it’s not a song about a young woman who hates where she is and needs to get out, it’s a song about a woman who loves where she lives and her family and her culture and still has this feeling. So what do you do with it? I related to that as well and so that was the final insight we needed to get that moment to really strike a chord because it’s messier, it’s complicated.

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New International Students Hail from 37 Countries

This fall, Wesleyan welcomes 127 first-year international students, eight international transfer students and seven visiting international students to campus. Students come from 37 different countries including Moldova, Kazakhstan and Mauritius. Two students are from a new exchange program with York University-York.

International students arrived Aug. 26-27 and participated in International Student Orientation through Aug. 29. During this time, students attended sessions that address health and medical insurance issues, programs about cultural adaptation, weather adjustment, and liberal arts education and U.S. systems. This program prepares international students and U.S. citizens living abroad to successfully transition to New Student Orientation.

On Aug. 29, the international students gathered for a group photo at Usdan University Center. Dinner and skits followed at Beckham Hall. Photos of the event are below. A full set of event photos can be found on Flickr. (Photos by Tom Dzimian)

 

New Students Welcomed to Wesleyan at Summer Sendoffs

Wesleyan’s newest students and their families are welcomed to the Wesleyan community during a series of Summer Sendoffs June 20 to Aug. 25. Alumni and parents are hosting the events at various locations around the world.

All members of the Wesleyan community are invited to attend the casual socials. Pictured below are photos from a few of the gatherings:

The Taiwan Summer Sendoff, held June 17, was organized and sponsored by Mark Hsieh and May Chao.

The Taiwan Summer Sendoff, held June 17, was organized and sponsored by Mark Hsieh ’90 and May Chao ’06. Ying Jia Tan, assistant professor of history, assistant professor of East Asian studies, also attended.

Bissell ’88 Balances Social Impact, Scale in Ethnic Goods Retailer Fabindia

William Bissell is on the cover of Forbes Magazine in India.

William Bissell ’88 is on the cover of Forbes India.

William Bissell ’88, managing director of Fabindia, a retail enterprise begun by Bissell’s father, John, in 1960, is featured on the cover of Forbes India on Jan. 20, a special issue on social impact. “A Fab New World: Not Only is Ethnic Goods Retailer Fabinidia Spreading its Wings, It Continues to Shape the Lives of Thousands of Rural Artisans,” the cover line reads.

The article, by Forbes India staff writer Anshul Dhamija, details the beginnings of the company, as an exporter of hand-loomed fabrics and furnishings with only one initial retail store, which opened in New Delhi in 1976. The second opened in the same city in 1994. William Bissell took the helm in 1999, after his father’s death in 1998. The younger Bissell had returned to India after graduating from Wesleyan, establishing an artisans’ cooperative, the Bhadrajun Artisans Trust.

Forbes India charts the astronomic—yet socially conscious—growth of the company since the turn of the century. William Bissell, with a vision to redesign the stores as “retail experience centers” (more than tripling the size, offering cafes, “children’s zones,” and on-site tailoring), plans to open 40 of these centers across the country in the next year-and-half, many as franchise opportunities—all the while maintaining the company’s commitment to local artisans and traditional crafts. Of particular interest is the high percentage of women who are employed by Fabindia in a country not noted for providing financial opportunities for females.

ISO Helps International Students Become Acclimated to Campus Life

International students gather at Usdan University Center on Aug. 30.

International students gathered at Usdan University Center on Aug. 30.

Wesleyan welcomed more than 140 international students and U.S. citizens living abroad to campus this week. On Aug. 30, they gathered for a group photo, dinner and skits.

Sixteen percent of the entire Class of 2020 hail from 34 other countries including Austria and Belgium to Tanzania, Tunisia and the Ukraine.

“This is the most truly global class in Wesleyan history with students of more than 50 nationalities who bring an incredible range of international, multicultural backgrounds and experiences to the Wesleyan community,” said Nancy Hargrave Meislahn, dean of admission and financial aid.

After arriving on campus Aug. 27-28, the Office of International Student Affairs (OISA) hosted International Student Orientation. ISO is held prior to New Student Orientation in order for students coming from across the the globe to recover from travel. ISO offers sessions that address health and medical insurance issues, programs about cultural adaptation, weather adjustment, and liberal arts education, as well as informational sessions about U.S. systems that many international students may not be familiar with or that are different from their home country.

Photos of the international students are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake)

International students at Wesleyan, Aug. 30, 2016.

International students at Wesleyan, Aug. 30, 2016.

International students at Wesleyan, Aug. 30, 2016.

International students at Wesleyan, Aug. 30, 2016.

International students at Wesleyan, Aug. 30, 2016.

International students at Wesleyan, Aug. 30, 2016.

International students at Wesleyan, Aug. 30, 2016.

International students at Wesleyan, Aug. 30, 2016.

International students at Wesleyan, Aug. 30, 2016.

International students at Wesleyan, Aug. 30, 2016.

International students at Wesleyan, Aug. 30, 2016.

CEAS Hosts “Environment in East Asia” Student Conference

"Environment in East Asia" was the topic of the inaugural College of East Asian Studies Student Conference held March 25. The conference included an interdisciplinary panel of Wesleyan faculty discussing issues related to the environment in East Asia; break-out sessions conducted in four languages (Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean); and a wrap-up session to bring all conversations together.

“Environment in East Asia” was the topic of the inaugural College of East Asian Studies Student Conference held March 25. The conference included an interdisciplinary panel of Wesleyan faculty discussing issues related to the environment in East Asia; break-out sessions conducted in four languages (Chinese, English, Japanese, Korean); and a wrap-up session to bring all conversations together.

More than 60 students gathered in Beckham Hall for the College for East Asian Studies Student Conference, “Environment in Asia,” co-sponsored with the Center for Global Studies and the Center for Pedagogical Innovation on March 25.

Professor of Government Mary Alice Haddad, Associate Professor of Music Su Zheng, and Associate Professor of Film Studies Lisa Dombrowski offered their discipline as a lens through which to view environmental concerns in the region— from using political action to regulate pollution, to music videos that call attention to smog concerns, to films that highlight the surreal aspects of man-made structures that change the landscape.

Following the talks, students adjourned small discussion groups. The conference was unique in offering conversation in each of four languages, noted Haddad, who is also chair of the College for East Asian Studies and professor of East Asian studies and professor of environment studies.

“At Wesleyan, we have enough language competency for students to engage in meaningful, intellectually rigorous discussions in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean,” said Haddad. “We have enough diversity on campus that any given session will likely have no fewer that four nationalities represented.”

After the sessions, the students and professors then convened to bring their observations back to the group—and to plan similar events.

Haddad was pleased with the conference, calling it “an extraordinary event that highlighted everything that is so special about Wesleyan.” She said, “Students from around the globe interacted in multiple languages discussing one of the most important issues of our time. Faculty from different disciplines illuminated and discovered new insights as we discussed our work in the interdisciplinary panel.
She also noted that student identity groups were the primary organizers of the event, “generating the ideas and the energy underneath everything. It was one of those moments in which everything comes together.”

Haddad also places the event in context of growth: “The CEAS received two large institutional grants this year. One was from the Japan Foundation to hire a new tenure track faculty member in traditional Japanese literature. The other was from the Korea Foundation to hire a new tenure track faculty member in Korean political economy. Although neither of the grants had funds for student conferences, and thus were not direct funders of the events, some of the inspiration for the event came from our wish to celebrate the growth and vibrancy of our new College.”

See additional photos of the conference below: (Photos by Olivia Drake)

 Professor of Government Mary Alice Haddad spoke on "Environmental Politics in East Asia." Haddad also is chair and professor of East Asian studies and professor of environmental studies.


Professor of Government Mary Alice Haddad spoke on “Environmental Politics in East Asia.” Haddad also is chair and professor of East Asian studies and professor of environmental studies.

Bevilacqua ’12 and Alam ’15: Translating, Publishing Wiesel’s Night in Indonesian

Max Bevilacqua ’12 spent a year teaching English in Indonesia on a Fulbright. Elie Weisel's memoir, Night, proved a bridge to understanding between cultures.

Max Bevilacqua ’12 spent a year teaching English in Indonesia on a Fulbright. Elie Weisel’s memoir, Night, proved a bridge to understanding between cultures. (photo credit: Sarah Gormley)

It doesn’t seem an obvious choice, publishing one of the most important memoirs to come out of the Holocaust into the language of a country that is home to the world’s largest Muslim population—but that’s exactly the project Max Bevilacqua ’12 and Mansoor Alam ’15 have taken on.
The project is the brainchild of Bevilacqua, who grew up in a Jewish household and studied Christianity as a religion major at Wesleyan. As a Fulbright scholar, he requested placement in Indonesia, which is 88 percent Muslim, and where he taught English. State department officials—as well as family and friends—encouraged Bevilacqua not to reveal his religious identity, since Judaism is not sanctioned there.

“I struggled with that,” he said. “But I came to see it as— I wanted to be ‘Max, the American who is our teacher.’ I didn’t want my religion to be distraction.”
Still, the secret weighed on him. Ten days before his year was complete, he gathered his friends. “You should know that I’m Jewish,” he said.

His announcement was met with some confusion—why hadn’t he told them? It was a time to acknowledge his own fears and biases—and the best way seemed to be with a book: Night, by Elie Wiesel. This memoir recounted Weisel’s horrific experiences as a young boy in the German concentration camps during World War II.

“The book provided an epiphany of the trauma that has been associated with being Jewish,” Bevilacqua said.

Back in the United States, Bevilacqua continued pondering the bridge he’d found. What would it take to share this powerful book with a country that had never had it available to them?

He remembered that he already knew a publisher: Mansoor Alam ’15. The two had met as undergrads. Alam describes Bevilacqua as “very personable—you can sit down and really talk with him.” Bevilacqua calls Alam “humble and brilliant; a true Renaissance man.”

With his own publishing company, Mansoor Alam ’15 was the ideal partner for Bevilacqua. In this 2012 photo, Alam was in Karachi, Pakistan, supporting community educational initiatives.

With his own publishing company, Mansoor Alam ’15 was the ideal partner for Bevilacqua. In this 2012 photo, Alam was in Karachi, Pakistan, supporting community educational initiatives.

Alam had started his own publishing company as a first-year student at Wesleyan. “There are so many good writers and great content that doesn’t make it to readers; I wanted to figure out a way to give authors autonomy and make it cost effective,” he explained. He provides his clients with assistance in copyediting, graphics and marketing.

“When Max talked to me about the project, I knew we absolutely had to do this,” Alam said. “The challenge of it—the ‘what’— was thrilling to me, and Max was so passionate about the ‘why’ of it.”

The “what” began with obtaining rights from the French publishing company, in a series of carefully crafted letters written in French. Next, they lined up a cohort of French/Indonesian translators.

The process is intensive. “It’s such a visceral, personal book,” Bevilacqua said.

Bevilacqua urges us not to forget Indonesia when we, in the West, look to form relationships with Muslim-majority countries.

Bevilacqua urges us not to forget Indonesia when we, in the West, look to form relationships with Muslim-majority countries.

“Max was worried about losing the impact of those details,” Alam said. “To make sure that doesn’t happen, we rely on a network. Translators compare their work—how they rendered this word, that phrase.”

With the translation nearly completed, Bevilacqua is focused on coordinating classrooms in American and in Indonesia who will read Night together. “It’s a book that can bridge cultures,” he said. “When we think about the Muslim world, let’s also look to developing friendships in Indonesia.”

To follow their progress, see http://growingoodfaith.org/.

Wesleyan Welcomes New International Students

Wesleyan international students posed for a group photo with their Orientation Leaders on Sept. 1 and learned to shout "Go Wes!"

Wesleyan international students posed for a group photo with their Orientation Leaders on Sept. 1 and learned to shout “Go Wes!”

Wesleyan welcomed 88 international students and 31 U.S. citizens living abroad to campus this week. On Sept. 1, they gathered for a group photo and dinner.

Starting Aug. 31, the students, who hail from more than 58 countries, from Argentina to Zimbabwe, participated in International Student Orientation. ISO is held prior to New Student Orientation in order for students coming from across the the globe to recover from travel. ISO offers sessions that address health and medical insurance issues, programs about cultural adaptation, weather adjustment, and liberal arts education, as well as informational sessions about U.S. systems that many international students may not be familiar with or that are different from their home country.

The program prepares international students and U.S. citizens living abroad to successfully transition to New Student Orientation, which is held Sept. 2-6. Extended orientation activities are held throughout the month of September.

Photos of the international students are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake)

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Tennis Star Chong ’18 Represents Hong Kong at the 17th Asian Games

Eudice Chong '18 hails from Sai Kung, Hong Kong.

Eudice Chong ’18 hails from Sai Kung, Hong Kong.

Eudice Chong ’18 has blossomed as the top player on Wesleyan’s women’s tennis team in her first season. Recently in action during a tournament at Conn. College (Oct. 5), she defeated Trinity’s #1 player and Amherst’s #2 player, both in straight sets.  Each opponent was a top-eight seed in the Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) New England fall championship, which Eudice missed in September in order to traveled to South Korea for nearly two weeks to represent her native Hong Kong at the 17th Asian Games.  Here is a bit about Eudice and her experience:

Q: You just finished playing the the 17th Asian Games in South Korea, essentially the regional Olympics for some 45 nations. How would you describe the experience and nature of the competition?

A: The Asian Games was definitely one of the best experiences I’ve ever had, playing players ranked in the top 100 World Tennis Association (WTA) and getting to meet some people up close I’ve only seen on TV. Everyone in the tournament is very good — everyone was chosen to play in the Asian Games because they are the best in their country.

Q: In what events did you participate? How well did you do?

A: I played in the Team, Mixed Doubles and Women’s Doubles Events. During the Team Event, Hong Kong lost to China in the quarterfinals as my teammates and I lost to players all ranked in the top 200 WTA. In the Women’s Doubles Event, my partner and I won one round, but lost to a Thai pair which had a player who was ranked as high as 20 and another who is currently ranked top 200. Lastly, for the Mixed Doubles Event, my partner and I advanced to the round of 16, losing to a Taiwanese pair with the woman reaching the finals of Mixed Doubles in Wimbledon this year.

Q: You’ve been living in Hong Kong since you were about a year old. How wide-spread is the interest in tennis in the region and when did you figure out you were hooked on the sport?

A:  Well, I’d say tennis is more of a social game in Hong Kong. If you walk around the city, you’ll tend to see older adults playing

Wesleyan Welcomes 109 International Students to the Class of 2018

International students shout "Go Wes!" during their orientation Aug. 26 at Usdan University Center.

International students shout “Go Wes!” during their orientation Aug. 26 at Usdan University Center.

Students from 30 different countries joined the Class of 2018 during International Student Orientation, held Aug. 24-26.

This fall, 109 undergraduate students come from international countries, including students who are U.S. citizens but live abroad. Three students are visiting from Germany, two from Spain and one from France.

This year, Wesleyan has students who hail from Guatemala,