Tag Archive for Class of 2010

Film By Kaplan ’10 to Premiere at Slamdance Festival

Henry Kaplan '10

Henry Kaplan ’10

We Together, a short film by Henry Kaplan ’10, has been accepted into the Slamdance Film Festival and will be playing in Park City, Utah, later this month. Slamdance Film Festival runs alongside Sundance Film Festival every year, and is self-described as “a showcase for raw and innovative filmmaking,” with a focus on new and emerging artists, filmmakers, and storytellers.

We Together is a seven-minute long story of a zombie who comes to remember the person who he used to be, before he was a zombie. “The film premiered online this fall and garnered a lot of buzz from the online film community, like Vimeo Staff Pick, Fangoria, Gizmodo, among others,” explained Kaplan. “After getting into Slamdance, we’ve taken the film offline and it will have a ‘re-premiere’ at the festival.”

Kaplan explained the inspiration behind the film. “I liked the idea of going deep into the mind of a zombie, particularly one who is undergoing a transformation of sorts,” said Kaplan. “The film deals with a zombie who, under some odd circumstances, comes to remember little slices of what his life was like as a human. I think it’s a pretty universal experience, actually, such as when you smell or hear something that immediately (almost viscerally) puts you back in a time and place. My idea was to take this sort of visceral experience and adapt it to a fun zombie genre story.”

Additionally, several Los Angeles-based Wesleyan alumni were involved in the film, including Ben Kuller ’11, producer; Elizabeth Litvitskiy ’15, co-producer; Caillin Puente ’15, first assistant director; Matthew Wauhkonen ’08, digital VFX artist; Peter Cramer ’14, grip; and Jeffrey Kasanoff ’15 and Dan Fuchs ’15 as production assistants.

Kaplan, who was a film studies major, resides in Los Angeles and works as a director for music videos, commercials and short films.

We Together (Teaser) from American Painkillers on Vimeo.

Resor, Seixas ’10 Co-Author Paper on Structural Mapping of Hualapai Limestone

Phil Resor, associate professor of earth and environmental sciences, and Gus Seixas ’10 are co-authors of “Constraints on the evolution of vertical deformation and Colorado River incision near eastern Lake Mead, Arizona, provided by quantitative structural mapping of the Hualapai Limestone,” published in the February 2015 issue of Geosphere, Vol. 11, pages 31-49. The paper includes research from Seixas’s honors thesis at Wesleyan.

In this study, the authors quantify the structural geometry of Hualapai Limestone, which was deposited in a series of basins that lie in the path of the Colorado River. The limestone was deformed by by a fault pair known as the Wheeler and Lost Basin Range faults.

Wesleyan’s Center for Prison Education Celebrates Expansion to Women’s Prison

Wesleyan's Center for Prison Education hosted a celebration on Jan. 24 in honor of the program expanding to include women at the York Correctional Institution in Niantic, Conn. On Jan. 28, two Wesleyan professors will begin teaching classes for college credit. Nineteen prisoners have been selected to participate in the classes, out of 90 who applied. Alexis Sturdy '10 (center), Wesleyan's Center for Prison Education program manager, mingles with guests at the celebration.

Wesleyan’s Center for Prison Education hosted a celebration on Jan. 24 in honor of the program expanding to include women at the York Correctional Institution in Niantic, Conn. On Jan. 28, two Wesleyan professors will begin teaching classes for college credit. Nineteen prisoners have been selected to participate in the classes, out of 90 who applied. Alexis Sturdy ’10 (center), Wesleyan’s Center for Prison Education program manager, mingles with guests at the celebration.

Ostfeld ’10, MA ’11, Semi-Finalist for Sierra Club “Best Internship”

Rosemary Ostfeld ’10, MA ’11

Rosemary Ostfeld ’10, MA ’11, an E&ES and biology major, is a semi-finalist for Sierra Club’s “Best Internship on Earth.” The winner will spend the summer video-blogging on different Sierra Club outings sponsored by the club’s Inner City Outings, Building Bridges to the Outdoors, and Volunteer Vacations programs.

A four-year member of Wesleyan’s Outing Club and former house manager of OutHouse, Ostfeld also developed and led an outdoor program for Snow Elementary School in Middletown. She says that Suzanne O’Connell, associate professor of earth and environmental sciences and director of service learning, encouraged her to apply for the internship with the Sierra Club.

She had learned about documentary film making in FILM 140, “Making the Science Documentary” a service learning course that she took in 2007, with Adjunct Assistant Professor of Film Studies Jacob Bricca and Associate Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Manju Hingorani.

Ostfeld received the good news that she’d made it to the semi-finals, along with a message from the contest officials telling her, “This week, we’re inviting folks to view the videos and leave comments to let us know who they would like to see get the position and become our Outdoors Youth Ambassador. While this won’t be the determining factor in who we choose, we’ll be looking to see who’s getting attention.”

Ostfeld (“Contestant 21”) invites you to view her video entry and submit your comments.

(See an earlier WesLive for further information on Hingorani and Bricca’s course.)



Dwyer ’10 Named Gagliardi Trophy Finalist

Shea Dwyer ’10

Running back Shea Dwyer ’10 became the second Wesleyan player to receive the distinction of Gagliardi Trophy finalist when the 10 players still eligible for Division III’s version of the Heisman Trophy were announced Nov. 23.  In total, 26 players were nominated for the coveted award before the Gagliardi committee narrowed the choice to 10.  Dwyer joins Wesleyan receiver Matt Perceval ’00, who was a Gagliardi Trophy finalist during the 1999 season.

To see the breakdown of the 10 Gagliardi Trophy finalists on d3football.com and find out how to become a part of the voting for the winner, click  here.

Dwyer, who played during the 2010 football season, was a conference leader. He paced the NESCAC in rushing yards with 1,242, a school record; set a Wesleyan record for yards in a game (255 vs. Colby); was twice named NESCAC Co-Offensive Player of the Week; and was a Gridiron Club of Greater Boston weekly Gold Helmet Award winner. He ranked fourth in NCAA Division III for rushing yards per game (155.2) and was sixth nationally among all NCAA running backs. Dwyer, who had just 692 career rushing yards coming into the 2010 campaign, scored 12 touch downs, 11 of them on the ground. He ended his career with 1,934 career rushing yards and 20 touch downs. Dwyer also was named a Division II/III all-star by the New England Football Writers Association.

Hsu ’10 Honored by American Physical Society

The Department of Physics hosted a reception Oct. 8 in the Walter Cady Lounge to honor Wade Hsu ’10 (pictured at left), who received the LeRoy Apker Award from the American Physical Society. Hsu was the only student from a Ph.D-granting institution in the country to receive the award. (Photos by Brian Stewart)

The American Physical Society awarded Chia Wei “Wade” Hsu ’10 with its prestigious LeRoy Apker Award for his achievements while at Wesleyan.

The American Physical Society awards the Apker Award to only one student from a Ph.D-granting institution each year. Reinhold Blümel, the Charlotte Agusta Ayres Professor of Physics, calls it a “mini-Nobel Prize.”

The award provides encouragement to young physicists who have demonstrated great potential for future scientific accomplishment.

“This means that Wade out-competed students from MIT, Stanford, Harvard, Princeton and CalTech,” says Wade’s former advisor Francis Starr, associate professor of physics. “He’s the best of the best.”

On Oct. 8, the Physics Department hosted a reception in his honor.

“The celebration that people in physics department threw for me was a total surprise. I did not expect an event with such a scale, with so many professors, grads, undergrads and cheese and wine,” he says. “I felt like crying that so many people came, and that they seemed to be even happier than me. It was great. And certainly I had never felted as honored as on that day.”

The Apker award came with a $5,000 award,

Freeman Scholars Join Wesleyan from 11 Countries

The Wesleyan Freeman Asian Scholars Program enables qualified young men and women from each of 11 countries or regions – The People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam to come to Wesleyan on full tuition scholarships.

This program is made possible by Wesleyan University and the Freeman Foundation, which aims to improve understanding and to strengthen ties between the United States and the countries of the Pacific Rim. Entry into the Wesleyan Freeman Asian Scholars Program is highly competitive: only one student will be selected annually from each country.

Below are photos of the 2010-11 Freeman Scholars at Wesleyan on Oct. 8. This is the 16th class of scholars. (Photos by Bill Burkhart)

The Class of 2011.

Givner ’10 to Experience Chinese Culture First Hand

Matthew Givner ’10

On Sept. 1, Matthew Givner ’10 became one of 19 Princeton-in-Asia fellows from around the world who is teaching English in a Chinese province.

Givner moved to Dalain, a city of 6.5 million people located 288 miles east of Beijing.  There, he is teaching English, writing, reading and speaking to students at Dalian University of Technology with three other fellows. He teaches 14 class hours per week.

Givner learned of the program through a family friend and Wesleyan’s Career Resource Center. He attended two information sessions on the program at the Career Resource Center and decided to apply.  

Honors Thesis by Tolman ’10 Published in Schizophrenia Bulletin

Arielle Tolman ’10 presents her honors thesis to Wesleyan President Michael Roth. Her findings were recently accepted for publication in Schizophrenia Bulletin.

Quality-of-life for patients with Schizophrenia has been recognized as a crucial domain of outcome in schizophrenia treatment, and yet its determinants are not well understood.

Arielle Tolman ’10, who studied “Neurocognitive Predictors of Objective and Subjective Quality-of-Life in Individuals with Schizophrenia: A Meta-Analytic Investigation” as her senior honors thesis, will have the opportunity to share her research with other scientists interested in schizophrenia. This month, the editors of  Schizophrenia Bulletin accepted Tolman’s paper for publication in an upcoming edition.

“This is a real achievement, particularly at the undergraduate level,” says the paper’s co-author and Tolman’s advisor Matthew Kurtz, assistant professor of psychology.

Although other researchers have demonstrated that “quality-of-life” is not a uniform construct, Tolman conducted the first meta-analytic study

Kurose ’10 Talks About College to Workforce Transition in WSJ

Charles Kurose ’10 who graduated in May with a degree in economics, discusses what it is like to go from the very top of one social system – being a college senior – to the very bottom of a new system: the job market and an entry level position, in a June 15 Wall Street Journal article.

“The transition from college to the workforce is a watershed in your life, where you leap from the peak of one totem pole to clutch at the bottom of a new one,” he writes. “You find yourself in a new setting with new people. You must show to these people that you have skills and talents that can contribute value to the joint work you will do together. In hiring you, a group of these people revealed a faith in your abilities strong enough to merit giving you the opportunity to do that, but even they are waiting to see if you will actually rise to the occasion.”

Colton ’12, Kenworthy ’10 Part of World Cup Kick-Off

Clare Colton '12

Beth Kenworthy '09

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg invited Wesleyan Soccer players Clare Colton ’12 and Beth Kenworthy ’10, both playing this summer for the New York Athletic Club, to a reception at the Mayor’s Gracie Mansion June 9 as part of the World Cup Kick-off.

Fulbright Scholars Heading to Belgium, Turkey, Indonesia

At left, Melina Aguilar ’10 will teach English in Indonesia as a 2010-11 Fulbright scholar. She taught children at a boarding school in China last summer (pictured). Aguilar is one of four recent Wesleyan graduates to receive a Fulbright Scholarship.

Recent graduate Anne Rosenthal’s years of taking French and environmental science classes will come in useful next year as she studies Belgium’s efforts to stimulate market demand for environmentally friendly products.

Rosenthal ’10 is one of four Wesleyan alumni selected to participate in the Fulbright U.S. Student Program in 2010-11. Fulbright scholars conduct research abroad or teach English in foreign countries.

Anne Rosenthal ’10

Rosenthal, who double majored in French studies and environmental science, will enroll in graduate-level environmental management courses at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), while examining Belgium’s role within the European Union framework for green product certification, and Belgium’s promotion of greener consumption. During a semester abroad in Paris, Rosenthal became interested in the ways Europeans thought about the environment, especially compared to attitudes in the U.S.

“I hope to leave Europe with an understanding of why EU programs might or might not represent promising models for the U.S. by getting a sense of Belgian people’s attitudes toward environmental issues,” she says. “My project will allow me to continue pursuing both my passions of environment and French.  I am incredibly grateful to my Wesleyan professors