Olivia Drake

Winners of the Wes in the World Photo Contest Announced

On Nov. 13, the Fries Center for Global Studies announced the winners of the 2017-18 Wes in the World Photo Contest. More than 200 Wesleyan students, staff, faculty and alumni voted on 56 images in five different categories including landscape, people, contemporary issues, daily life and sports.

Photographs were submitted by international students and U.S. students who studied abroad.

View the winners below. View the honorable mentions online here.

“Cinque Terre Town” by Natalie Strassheim, ‘18 / Manarola, Italy “I was ready to capture some of my own awesome photos by embarking on a solo trip. I remember, in Pompeii, saying farewell to my study abroad friends. I boarded the train, heading off to my next stop in Italy. This was the beginning to feeling independent. This was the start to feeding my wanderlust.”

BEST PHOTO OF LANDSCAPE: “Cinque Terre Town” by Natalie Strassheim ‘18, Manarola, Italy. “I was ready to capture some of my own awesome photos by embarking on a solo trip. I remember, in Pompeii, saying farewell to my study abroad friends. I boarded the train, heading off to my next stop in Italy. This was the beginning to feeling independent. This was the start to feeding my wanderlust,” she said.

Col. Cassidy Is Wesleyan’s First Retired Military Officer Teaching Fellow

As Wesleyan's inaugural Retired Military Officer Teaching Fellow Robert "Bob" Cassidy is actively building relationships and understanding between the U.S. Armed Services and Wesleyan students.

As Wesleyan’s inaugural Retired Military Officer Teaching Fellow, Robert “Bob” Cassidy is actively building relationships and understanding between the U.S. Armed Services and Wesleyan students. Cassidy, who joined the U.S. Army in 1981, focuses his teaching, research and scholarship on international security, strategy, irregular war and military culture. His office is located in the Public Affairs Center.

In this Q&A, and in honor of Veterans Day on Nov. 11, Retired Military Officer Teaching Fellow Robert “Bob” Cassidy speaks about his military career, thoughts on the Iraq invasion and teaching at Wesleyan. (Brandon Sides ’18 contributed to this article.)

Q: How did you acquire your teaching fellowship at Wesleyan?

A: I received a Retired Officer Teaching Fellowship (ROTF) through the Chamberlain Project, which supports fellowships at some of the nation’s top liberal arts institutions. Fellows are required to work on building relationships and understanding between the U.S. Armed Services and civilian institutions and to contribute to the richness and diversity of students’ educational experiences. We also teach two full-credit courses. This fall and next spring, I am teaching a seminar on Policy and Strategy in War and Peace at the Center for the Study of Public Life.

Q: What material is covered in this course?

A: We explore the meaning of civilian-military relations and how those relations interact with our ability to align policy and strategy. We start with the Vietnam War and cover eight wars through the present. So far this semester, we’ve studied the Vietnam War, the Persian Gulf War, the peace operations and combat operations in Somalia, the initial war in Afghanistan, and this week, we cover the bad decisions behind the invasion of Iraq. We will end with a look at where we are now with policy and strategy, and the wars in Afghanistan and elsewhere against the likes of the Islamic State.

Wesleyan’s Vocal Talent Showcased at Stone A Cappella Concert

Once called the “singing college of New England,” Wesleyan still boasts strong musical traditions. On Nov. 5, multiple student groups performed at the 7th Annual Stone A Cappella Concert held in Memorial Chapel. The concert, held in conjunction with Homecoming/Family Weekend, provides an extraordinary showcase of the vocal talent and stage presence of Wesleyan undergraduates.

The performance is sponsored by the Charles B. Stone Jr. A Cappella Fund, which was established through the generosity of Sarah Stone Maynard ’79, P’11 and Fred Maynard ’80, P’11. It honors of Sarah’s father, Chip Stone ’49, P’79, P’82, GP’11, GP’15, and celebrates the Stone family’s long Wesleyan legacy.

Photos of the concert are below: (Photos by Caroline Kravitz ’19 and Rebecca Goldfarb Terry ’19)

Football’s 35-0 Victory, “The Big Roll”: Highlights of 2017 Homecoming/Family Weekend

Hundreds of Wesleyan alumni and families participated in the traditional Homecoming/Family Weekend Tailgating event on Andrus Field.

Hundreds of Wesleyan alumni and families, visiting campus for Homecoming/Family Weekend Nov. 3–5, participated in the traditional Homecoming/Family Weekend tailgating event on Andrus Field.

On Nov. 4 during Homecoming/Family Weekend, more than 5,000 Cardinal football fans cheered Wesleyan to a 35–0 victory over Little Three archrival Williams College.

Throughout the three-day event, parents, alumni, students, families and friends also attended tailgating events, campus tours, 20 WESeminars, the 25th Annual Dwight L. Greene Symposium, the 7th Annual Stone A Cappella Concert, gallery exhibits, a family swim, multiple dinners and receptions and much more.

Kate Quigley Lynch ’82, P’17, ’19, assistant director of The Wesleyan Fund for University Relations, attended HCFW events as a Wes alumna, parent and staff member with her husband, Christopher Lynch ’81. In addition to co-organizing the 50th Reunion Planning meeting, Quigley Lynch and members of her family attended the President’s Reception honoring leadership donors and volunteers; the Alumni Association tailgate; and a WESeminar on the Evolution of the Real Estate Industry, led by Matt Winn ’92 and Marshall Brozost ’89.

Shasha Seminar Explores the Role of Guns in America

The 16th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns, held Oct. 27–28 on campus, convened experts, including Wesleyan alumni, from across the country to examine current debates about the role of guns in American history, society, law and politics. The Shasha Seminar is an educational forum for Wesleyan alumni, parents and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small seminar environment. Endowed by James Shasha ’50, P’82, the Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns supports lifelong learning and encourages participants to expand their knowledge and perspectives on significant issues.

Seminar organizer Jennifer Tucker, associate professor of history and associate professor of science in society at Wesleyan, noted in a previous article that “Firearms possession is possibly one of the most divisive topics in the country.” Her goal was for the event to “create a forum for conversations about current gun ownership and laws with room for a variety of perspectives on this topic. We want for this university seminar to be a forum for discussions and a meeting point for current research about firearms possession and use from a number of different fields,” she said.

The 16th Annual Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns, held Oct. 27-28 on campus, convened experts, including Wesleyan alumni, from different fields across the country to examine current debates about the role of guns in American history, society, law and politics. The Shasha Seminar is an educational forum for Wesleyan alumni, parents, and friends that provides an opportunity to explore issues of global concern in a small seminar environment. Endowed by James Shasha '50, P'82, the Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns supports lifelong learning and encourages participants to expand their knowledge and perspectives on significant issues.

Beginning in Memorial Chapel on Friday afternoon with a keynote speech by Richard Slotkin, Olin Professor of English and American Studies, Emeritus (see photo below), the weekend proved to be a venue for education, questions and much discussion on concerns surrounding guns in American society.

Richard Slotkin, the Olin Professor of American Studies, Emeritus, delivered the keynote address titled “Open Season: The Gun Rights Movement and American Political Culture.” Slotkin discussed the current struggle over firearms legislation and how it has been shaped by a political movement, which links a radical understanding of “gun rights” to the agendas of American conservatism.

Richard Slotkin, the Olin Professor of English and American Studies, Emeritus, delivered the keynote address titled “Open Season: The Gun Rights Movement and American Political Culture.” Slotkin discussed the current struggle over firearms legislation and how it has been shaped by a political movement, which links a radical understanding of “gun rights” to the agendas of American conservatism.

Belichick Plaza Dedicated in Recognition of the Leadership, Generosity of Bill ’75, P’07, Hon. ’05 and Amanda Belichick ’07

New England Patriots Head Coach Bill Belichick ’75, P’07, Hon. ’05 and his daughter, Amanda Belichick ’07, visited campus during Homecoming/Family Weekend on Nov. 3. After greeting and speaking to members of the Wesleyan football team, the Belichicks attended a reception at the Belichick Plaza (formerly Warren Street lobby), dedicated in recognition of the leadership and generosity of Bill and Amanda Belichick. (Photos and information by Olivia Drake, Cynthia Rockwell and Tom Dzimian)

Bill and Amanda Belichick joined Whalen, Morea and Wesleyan President Michael Roth in a ribbon cutting ceremony to officially acknowledge the inside the newly-named Belichick Plaza

Bill and Amanda Belichick, center, joined Mike Whalen, the Frank V. Sica Director of Athletics; Board of Trustees Chair Donna Morea ’76, P’06 and Wesleyan President Michael Roth in a ribbon cutting ceremony to officially acknowledge the newly-named Belichick Plaza. “The great thing about this school and what this building stands for is that at Wesleyan, we have student athletes here. You don’t have to choose between being a student or being an athlete; you can be both,” Bill Belichick said during the Belichick Plaza dedication. “That’s what I was looking for in college, and that’s what Amanda was looking for — to participate in intercollegiate athletics and also be challenged at a high level academically. Here, you really can do both.”

Preschoolers Trick-or-Treat on Campus

On Oct. 31, Wesleyan’s Neighborhood Preschool participated in the annual NPS Halloween Parade. The children, accompanied by their families and care-takers, stopped at Exley Science Center, Olin Library, South College and North College to trick-or-treat, sing songs and show off their costumes. Many trick-or-treaters are the children of Wesleyan faculty and staff. Wesleyan President Michael Roth and several staff from University Communications offered candy to the parade participants. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

C-CERT Explores Closed Butterfield Basement and Former Tunnel System

Jeff Sweet, associate director of facilities management, leads C-CERT members through Butterfield C's unique "tunnel" system as part of a training exercise. In the 1990’s, the tunnel system was closed and secured due to health and safety concerns.

Jeff Sweet, associate director of facilities management, leads C-CERT members through Butterfield C’s unique underground “tunnel” system as part of a training exercise to learn more about unknown areas of campus. In the 1990s, the basement level was closed and secured due to health and safety concerns.

On Oct. 17, Wesleyan’s Campus Community Emergency Response Team (C-CERT) toured the basement level, or “tunnels” of the Butterfield complex. Built in 1965, the Butterfields encompassed 166,000 gross square feet in three separate dormitory buildings — A, B and C — which are connected by vibrant, graffiti-rich underground tunnels.

Through the years, the tunnels served as passageways to student residences, classrooms, administration offices, recreational areas, restrooms, laundry rooms, study areas, kitchenettes, mechanical areas, a mailroom, photographic darkrooms and even a kosher kitchen. Skateboarders marked the ground with safe paths, noting where to stop at blind corners. Artists, poets and writers used the tunnels’ walls as a concrete canvas for cartoons, prose, quotations, journals and messages.

Hallie Lecture Focuses on Ancient Greece and Beyond

On Oct. 25, the College of Letters welcomed Greek political philosophy expert Melissa Lane to campus to deliver the 24th annual Philip Hallie Lecture. Lane spoke on "Office and Accountability in Ancient Greece and Beyond." Lane is the Class of 1943 Professor of Politics at Princeton University, where she is also director of the University Center for Human Values, and an associated faculty member in the Departments of Classics and of Philosophy. Previously she taught in the Faculty of History at the University of Cambridge, after receiving there an M.Phil. and PhD in philosophy.

On Oct. 25, the College of Letters welcomed Greek political philosophy expert Melissa Lane to campus to deliver the 24th annual Philip Hallie Lecture. Lane spoke on “Office and Accountability in Ancient Greece and Beyond.” Lane is the Class of 1943 Professor of Politics at Princeton University, where she is also director of the University Center for Human Values, and an associated faculty member in the Departments of Classics and of Philosophy. Previously she taught in the Faculty of History at the University of Cambridge, after receiving there an M.Phil. and PhD in philosophy.

Wesleyan to Offer Residency for Artists Impacted by 2017 Hurricanes

(by Andy Chatfield)

The Center for the Arts, in collaboration with the College of the Environment, invites an artist or artists from areas affected by the hurricane season of 2017 to campus for a short-term residency in April 2018. Artists working in all disciplines from Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands may propose a project that explores the evolving human relationship to water, and responds to the following questions:

  • How can the arts address and respond to the environmental and humanitarian crises wrought by climate change?
  • How do we redefine humankind’s evolving relationship to nature, specifically to water?
  • What role might the arts play in rebuilding after storms?

“Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts has a history of interdisciplinary programs, integrating the arts across campus,” said Wesleyan President Michael Roth. “This new one-time residency in collaboration with the College of the Environment will have an impact not only on the artist selected for the residency but also allow the Wesleyan community to respond to the environmental and social impact of these natural disasters.”

“The arts allow us to explore issues in ways no other medium does,” said Sarah Curran, director of the Center for the Arts. “The arts have a unique responsibility to help us improve our communities and world where ever we can. In these times of rebuilding after crisis, the arts can play a critical role in community building, envisioning, and imagining how we rebuild, and what we want to become.”

Project Details:
The Center for the Arts seeks to engage an artist in a 7 to 14 day residency in April 2018 on Wesleyan’s campus. Artists may work in any performing arts or visual arts discipline (music, dance, theater, visual arts), or in a practice that crosses disciplines. Artists are invited to create a work that responds to hurricanes and their environmental and social impact. We invite projects that also address environmental issues such as climate change, disaster, and disruption. The proposed project must include an opportunity for the Wesleyan community to interact with the creation of and/or presentation of the work. The project budget includes a $10,000 artist fee and up to $5,000 for travel and materials.

Eligibility:
• Artist must have permanent residency in one of the states or U.S. territories most directly impacted by the hurricane season of 2017 (Florida, Texas, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands). If a group of artists, the majority of the group must have residency as described above.
• Artist(s) must be available to travel to Middletown, Connecticut for a 7 to 14 day residency in April 2018 and be able to work within the budget outlined above.
• Artist(s) must be able to provide proof of eligibility to work in the United States.

Required Materials:
• Application form, including project description, resume, three references, and work samples submitted here.

Timeline:
Proposals are due at 11:59 p.m., Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. Decisions will be announced no later than Dec. 15, 2017.
Residency is in April 2018 (dates to be determined in consultation with selected artist).

For additional information, contact Michelle Grove, interim associate director for programs.

“After seeing the scope of this year’s hurricane season, we thought this was a way that we could both address the needs of artists in those areas, while also deepen the conversation on campus about climate change on the human environment,” said Barry Chernoff, director of the College of the Environment, Robert Schumann Professor of Environmental Studies. Chernoff also is chair of the Environmental Studies Program, professor of biology, professor of earth and environmental sciences.

 

duCille Delivers Slotkin Lecture on “Why Racial Representation Still Matters”

Ann duCille, professor of English, emerita, delivered the third annual Richard Slotkin Lecture in American Studies on "TV and the 'Thug Default': Why Racial Representation Still Matters" Oct. 26 in the Powell Family Cinema. Her new book, Technicolored: Reflections on Race in the Time of TV, from which her talk was drawn, is forthcoming from Duke University Press in 2018.

Ann duCille, professor of English, emerita, delivered the third annual Richard Slotkin Lecture in American Studies on “TV and the ‘Thug Default’: Why Racial Representation Still Matters” Oct. 26 in the Powell Family Cinema. Her new book, Technicolored: Reflections on Race in the Time of TV, from which her talk was drawn, is forthcoming from Duke University Press in 2018. DuCille was the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of the Humanities at Wesleyan from 1999-2005 and has chaired both the African American Studies Program and the English Department and also directed the Center for African American Studies.