Olivia Drake

Olivia (M.A.L.S. '08) is editor of the Wesleyan Connection newsletter and campus photographer. I have two dogs, five chickens and 30 house plants. I like snow, photographing firemen and enjoying "stinky" cheeses. Send me your story ideas to newsletter@wesleyan.edu.

Grossman Keynote Speaker at Chief Risk Officer Assembly

Richard Grossman

Richard Grossman

Richard Grossman, professor of economics, delivered a keynote speech at the 10th Chief Risk Officer Assembly in Munich, Germany on Nov. 19. The speech was based on his book, WRONG: Nine Economic Policy Disasters and What We Can Learn from Them (Oxford University Press), and focused the consequences of government policy for economic risk.

The CRO Assembly is organized by Geneva Association, an insurance industry think-tank, and the CRO Forum, which is made up of chief risk officers from large (primarily European) multi-national insurance and re-insurance companies. The conference took place at the headquarters of Munich RE, one of the world’s largest reinsurance companies. The program seeks to understand the nature of emerging and key strategic risks, and to understand how and where they relate to insurance.

Read more about Grossman in these past News @ Wesleyan articles.

Teter’s Book Receives Honorable Mention for Jewish Studies Award

sinnersontrialA book by Magda Teter, the Jeremy Zwelling Professor of Jewish Studies, received honorable mention for the 2014 Jordan Schnitzer Book Award. The Schnitzer Book Award was established in 2007 to recognize and promote outstanding scholarship in the field of Jewish Studies and to honor scholars whose work embodies the best in the field: innovative research, excellent writing and sophisticated methodology.

Teter’s book, Sinners on Trial: Jews and Sacrilege after the Reformation, published by Harvard University Press in 2011, was honored in the Medieval and Early Modern Jewish History category.

In recognizing her book, the Prize Committee wrote:

“In this beautifully written and richly documented work, Magda Teter traces and convincingly demonstrates the interdependence of economic, religious and political motives that animated Polish anti-Semitism in the early modern period. This book also identifies and elucidates significant factors in the history of their formations in East Central Europe, and in the history of the host-desecration charge in early modern Europe.”

Magda Teter

Magda Teter

In post-Reformation Poland—the largest state in Europe and home to the largest Jewish population in the world—the Catholic Church suffered profound anxiety about its power after the Protestant threat.

In the book, Teter reveals how criminal law became a key tool in the manipulation of the meaning of the sacred and in the effort to legitimize Church authority. The mishandling of sacred symbols was transformed from a sin that could be absolved into a crime that resulted in harsh sentences of mutilation, hanging, decapitation, and, principally, burning at the stake. Recounting dramatic stories of torture, trial, and punishment, this is the first book to consider the sacrilege accusations of the early modern period within the broader context of politics and common crime.

To celebrate the honorable mention, Teter is invited to attend the Jordan Schnitzer Book Award Reception Dec. 14 in Maryland.

Teter also is chair and professor of history, professor of medieval studies. She speaks more about the book and her research in this past News @ Wesleyan article.

Stemler Published in Journal of Study Abroad, Educational Psychology

Steve Stemler, associate professor of psychology, is the co-author of “Development and Validation of the Wesleyan Intercultural Competence Scale (WICS): A Tool for Measuring the Impact of Study Abroad Experiences,” published in Frontiers: the Interdisciplinary Journal of Study Abroad, XXIV, 25-47, 2014.

He’s also the co-author of “Testing the theory of successful intelligence through educational interventions in Grade 4 language arts, mathematics and science,” published in the Journal of Educational Psychology, 106(3), 881-899, 2014.

Alumni Speak on Careers for the Common Good

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On Nov. 19, four Wesleyan alumni spoke to students about their post-Wesleyan journeys in a panel discussion on “Careers for the Common Good.” The event was moderated by Lily Herman ’16, pictured at left. Panelists included, from left, Gregg Croteau ’93, Christian Philemon ’97, Katie Nihill ’10 and Matt Lesser ’10.

4 Alumni Speak to Students about Careers in New Media Journalism

Four Wesleyan alumni spoke to Wesleyan students about "Finding a Career Path in New Media Journalism" Nov. 18 in Downey House. Panelists included, from left, Zach Schonfeld '13, Gianna Palmer '10, Eric Lach '08 and Jillian Weinberger '07. 

Four Wesleyan alumni spoke to Wesleyan students about “Finding a Career Path in New Media Journalism” Nov. 18 in Downey House. Panelists included, from left, Zach Schonfeld ’13, Gianna Palmer ’10, Eric Lach ’08 and Jillian Weinberger ’07.

BIology Students Learn about Summer Research Programs

On Nov. 17 and 19, Ruth Johnson, assistant professor of biology, spoke to sophomores and juniors about applying to summer research programs. During the two-session workshop, Johnson discussed ways to write successful applications for summer programs at U.S. research institutions.

On Nov. 17 and 19, Ruth Johnson, assistant professor of biology, spoke to sophomores and juniors about applying to summer research programs. During the two-session workshop, Johnson discussed ways to write successful applications for summer programs at U.S. research institutions.

Students were required to attend both sessions and complete a mock application. The workshop also provided guidance on locating appropriate summer research programs and requesting supporting letters of recommendation.

Students were required to attend both sessions and complete a mock application. The workshop also provided guidance on locating appropriate summer research programs and requesting supporting letters of recommendation. (Photos by Dat Vu ’15)

Space Grant Consortium Awards Graduate Students’ Travel Grants

The NASA Connecticut Space Grant Consortium awarded two Student Travel Grants on Nov. 11. Each award is worth $1000.

Lisa Korn, a graduate student in earth and environmental sciences, will attend the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, held March 16-20 in The Woodlands, Texas. Her advisor is Marty Gilmore, chair and professor of earth and environmental sciences and the George I. Seney Professor of Geology.

Sam Factor, a BA/MA student in astronomy, will use the grant to attend the American Astronomical Society 223rd Meeting, held Jan 4-8 in Seattle, Wash. Factor’s advisor is Meredith Hughes, assistant professor of astronomy. Dilovan Serindag ’15, Jesse Lieman-Sifry ’15 and Trevor Dorn-Wallenstein ’15 also will attend the meeting.

Graduate Students Speak on Taiwanese Music at Ethnomusicology Meeting

Pictured at the Society for Ethnomusicology's Annual Meeting are, from left, Wesleyan's Ender Terwilliger, Po-wei Weng, Joy Lu and Su Zheng.v

Pictured at the Society for Ethnomusicology’s Annual Meeting are, from left, Wesleyan’s Ender Terwilliger, Po-wei Weng, Joy Lu and Su Zheng.

During the 2014 Society for Ethnomusicology’s 59th Annual Meeting, held Nov. 13-16 in Pittsburgh, Pa., Wesleyan graduate students collaborated to present the first panel dedicated to Taiwanese identity and music.

The panel, titled “How Taiwanese Should I Be? Contesting Taiwanese Identities in Local, Regional and Global Contexts,” comprised of Ph.D. candidates Joy Lu and Po-wei Weng, and graduate student Ender Terwilliger.

Su Zheng, associate professor of music, chaired the panel.

Covering Taiwanese opera, Pili Budaixi, and fusion performances, the panel explored the process of identity formation when promoting Taiwanese identity in politically delicate situations domestically and overseas.

In addition, Ph.D. candidates Dustin Wiebe, Min Yang and Fugan Dineen presented papers at the conference.

Green Street Hosts “Math on the Move” Workshop for Area Teachers

On Oct. 16, the Green Street Arts Center hosted a "Math on the Move" workshop for area math teachers. "Math on the Move" was a follow-up workshop for K-8 teachers who participated in the 2014 PIMMS Intel Math Summer Institute. The Project to Increase Mastery of Mathematics and Science (PIMMS), a partner of the Green Street Arts Center, developed the course for Middletown and Meriden teachers, supported by the Connecticut State Mathematics and Science Partnership grant of $158,483.

On Oct. 16, the Green Street Arts Center hosted a “Math on the Move” workshop for area math teachers. “Math on the Move” was a follow-up workshop for K-8 teachers who participated in the 2014 PIMMS Intel Math Summer Institute. The Project to Increase Mastery of Mathematics and Science (PIMMS), a partner of the Green Street Arts Center, developed the course for Middletown and Meriden teachers, supported by the Connecticut State Mathematics and Science Partnership grant of $158,483.

Liberty Bank Foundation Funds Scholarships for GSAC’s AfterSchool Program

libertybankThe Liberty Bank Foundation awarded the Green Street Arts Center with a $5,000 grant to support the center’s Discovery AfterSchool Program. The funds help provide scholarships for students who need financial assistance to attend the program.

The Discovery AfterSchool Program offers a range of classes in the arts, math, and sciences for children in Grades 1-8. The program brings those things together in a safe space for children to build self-esteem and problem-solving skills.

The AfterSchool team is made up of core education staff, professional instructors and Wesleyan students who serve as teaching assistants and homework tutors.

Fusso Translates Gandlevsky’s Trepanation of the Skull

fussotranslationSusanne Fusso, professor of Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies, is the translator of Sergey Gandlevsky’s autobiographical novel, Trepanation of the Skull, published in November from Northern Illinois University Press.

Sergey Gandlevsky is widely recognized as one of the leading living Russian poets and prose writers. His autobiographical novella Trepanation of the Skull is a portrait of the artist as a young late-Soviet man. At the center of the narrative are Gandlevsky’s brain tumor, surgery and recovery in the early 1990s. The story radiates out, relaying the poet’s personal history through 1994, including his unique perspective on the 1991 coup by Communist hardliners resisted by Boris Yeltsin. Gandlevsky tells wonderfully strange but true episodes from the bohemian life he and his literary companions led. He also frankly describes his epic alcoholism and his ambivalent adjustment to marriage and fatherhood.

Fusso’s translation marks the first volume in English of Sergey Gandlevsky’s prose. The book may appeal to scholars, students, and general readers of Russian literature and culture of the late Soviet and post-Soviet periods.

Fusso also is the translator and editor of Vladimir Sergeevich Trubetskoi’s A Russian Prince in the Soviet State: Hunting Stories, Letters from Exile, and Military Memoirs.

Gambell, O’Neill Receive Cardinal Achievement Awards

#THISISWHY

Lynne Gambell of the Finance Department and Krystal Gayle O’Neill of Residential Life each received a Cardinal Achievement Award in November.

Gambell, accounting specialist provided assistance to the Physical Plant-Facilities Department by processing more than 100 vouchers in one day. If the vouchers were not processed on time there were concerns that it would negatively impact Wesleyan’s local contractors.

“Lynne demonstrated extraordinary initiative in helping Wesleyan ensure that our contractors were paid in a timely fashion,” said Joyce Topshe, associate vice president for facilities.

Krystal Gayle O’Neill

Krystal Gayle O’Neill

O’Neill, area coordinator, was honored for taking the initiative to create a women’s group on campus. The women’s group has sponsored a number of events over the past several months, including two book club discussions, workshops on self-defense and on investing, as well as “meet and greet” lunches at local restaurants.

“Krystal has created a forum for women at Wesleyan to come together as a community of support and resources,” said Marina Melendez, dean for the Class of 2018.

“She selflessly has given of her time and energy so that we may all benefit, not only through personal and professional development, but also through forming connections with other women at Wesleyan,” said Fran Koerting, director of the Office of Residential Life.

This special honor comes with a $250 award and reflects the university’s gratitude for those extra efforts. Award recipients are nominated by department chairs and supervisors. Nominations can be made anytime throughout the year. For more information or to nominate a staff member for the award, visit the Cardinal Achievement Award website.

Recipients will continue to be recognized in News @ Wesleyan.

See past Cardinal Achievement Award recipients here.