Olivia Drake

Wireless Technology Innovations Discussed at Wesleyan’s Eduroam Summit

The Eduroam Summit was held inside Usdan University Center on June 23.

The Eduroam Summit was held inside Usdan University Center on June 23.

On June 23, Information Technology Services hosted a Eduroam Summit to discuss innovations in wireless technology. Eduroam (education roaming) is a secure, world-wide roaming access service developed for the international research and education community. Eduroam allows students, researchers and staff from participating institutions to obtain Internet connectivity across campus and when visiting other participating institutions by simply opening their laptop or smartphone.

Representatives from Wesleyan, Russell Library, the Connecticut Education Network, Middletown Public Schools, and the Connecticut Commission for Educational Technology attended the summit, which included a talk by Eduroam’s U.S. founder Philippe Hanset. Employees from Wesleyan included Karen Warren, director of user and technical services; James Taft, assistant director of technology support services; Ken Taillon, network administrator; and Mohit Bachhav, network administrator.

“We implemented Eduroam for our campus community, extending access for Wesleyan faculty, staff and students beyond Wesleyan’s campus to participating institutions worldwide,” Warren said. “Now that service may being expanded to K-12 students with the goal of enabling students throughout the state to access wireless via eduroam on Connecticut’s campuses and libraries. Wesleyan wants to be at the forefront of this initiative in partnership with Middletown Public Schools and Russell Library.”

The event was coordinated by Information Technology Services in conjunction with the Center for Community Partnerships.

Tang Authors Book on Asian American Literature after Multiculturalism

Amy TangAmy Tang, assistant professor of English, assistant professor of American studies, is the author of Repetition and Race: Asian American Literature After Multiculturalism published by Oxford University Press, May 2016,

Repetition and Race explores the literary forms and critical frameworks occasioned by the widespread institutionalization of liberal multiculturalism by turning to the exemplary case of Asian American literature. Tang reinterprets the political grammar of four forms of repetition central to minority discourse: trauma, pastiche, intertextuality and self-reflexivity.

She shows how texts by Theresa Cha, Susan Choi, Karen Tei Yamashita, Chang-rae Lee, and Maxine Hong Kingston use structures of repetition to foreground moments of social and aesthetic impasse, suspension, or hesitation rather than instances of reversal or resolution.

Lensing Reviews Biography of Fritz Lang

UnknownLeo Lensing, professor of film studies, is the author of a review essay titled “Fritz Lang, man of the eye. On the Edgar Allan Poe of German Cinema,” published in the June 15 issue of the Times Literary Supplement (London). The TLS cover article takes stock of Fritz Lang. Die Biographie (Propyläen Verlag, 2014), the first full-length biography in German of the great Austrian-German filmmaker Fritz Lang (1890-1976), and compares it unfavorably with Fritz Lang. The Nature of the Beast, the standard American life by Patrick McGilligan.

Lang’s reputation, Lensing writes, continues to be linked primarily to two films he made during the Weimar Republic: “the famous blockbuster flop Metropolis (1927)”; and M (1931), “the infamously empathetic profile of a serial killer, which Lang often called his favorite. Metropolis, still often categorized as ‘a flawed masterpiece’ by film scholars, has become even more popular and influential. Every metropolitan dystopia from Blade Runner to Batman Returns owes something to its visionary scenario of a technologically unhinged future.”

Lensing writes that “Grob’s treatment of the monumental making of this ‘urtext of cinematic modernity’ (Thomas Elsaesser) typifies his biography’s modest virtues. Grob’s narrative often veers between compact scenarios and long, thinly fleshed-out lists of people met, films seen, theater performances attended, art exhibitions visited and, especially, women wined and dined. While this enhanced name-dropping with its litany of intellectual, artistic and erotic contacts can be beguiling, the overall effect raises questions of the kind for which a biographer should supply answers.”

Personick Wins LaMer Award from American Chemical Society

Michelle Personick

Michelle Personick

Michelle Personick, assistant professor of chemistry, received the Victor K. LaMer Award from the American Chemical Society Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry. The honor, which comes with a $3,000 monetary award, was presented at the ACS Colloid and Surface Science Symposium June 5-8 at Harvard University, where she presented a plenary talk.

The Victor K. LaMer Award is presented to the author of an outstanding PhD thesis in colloid or surface chemistry. LaMer was the editor of the Journal of Colloid Science (now the Journal of Colloid and Interface Science) from its founding in 1946 to 1965. In addition to his seminal work on colloids, LaMer’s fundamental contributions to physical chemistry have found their way into every textbook and university course on that subject.

Personick received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Middlebury College in 2009 and a PhD in chemistry from Northwestern University in 2013. Her doctoral thesis was titled “Controlling the Shape and Crystallinity of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles.”

A key advance of her dissertation work was the development of a comprehensive set of design guidelines for controlling the shape of gold nanoparticles via reaction kinetics and surface passivation effects. Her graduate research contributed to 15 articles published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Nano Letters, Science and others.

From 2013 to 2015, Personick was a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard. As a member of the Integrated Mesoscale Architectures for Sustainable Catalysis (IMASC) Energy Frontier Research Center, she studied selective oxidative transformations of alcohols on nanoporous gold alloy catalysts. In July 2015, she joined the faculty at Wesleyan where her research focuses on the synthesis of noble metal alloy nanoparticles with well-defined shapes and catalytically active high-energy surfaces.

The Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry is one of the most active Divisions in the ACS with approximately 2,500 members throughout the world.

Poetry, Fiction, Memoir Writing Taught at 60th Annual Writers Conference

The Wesleyan Writers Conference celebrated its 60th year with discussions on poetry, fiction and non fiction writing, the short story, novel, publishing, The conference, held June 15-19, allowed anyone interested in the writer’s craft to hone their skills.

The Wesleyan Writers Conference celebrated its 60th year with discussions on poetry, fiction and non fiction writing, the short story, novel and publishing. The conference, held June 16-19, welcomes new writers, established writers, and everyone interested in the writer’s craft.

Anne Greene, director of the Wesleyan Writers Conference, welcomed the participants to the conference on June 16.

Anne Greene, director of the Wesleyan Writers Conference, welcomed the participants to the conference on June 16.

The program includes seminars, craft sessions, workshops, master classes, guest speakers, readings, panel discussions, and manuscript consultations.

The program included seminars, craft sessions, workshops, master classes, guest speakers, readings, panel discussions and manuscript consultations.

Amy Bloom, the Distinguished University Writer-in-Residence at Wesleyan, made remarks at the Writing Conference. Bloom is the author of three novels, three collections of short stories, a children's book, and an essay collection. She has been a nominee for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Amy Bloom, the Distinguished University Writer-in-Residence at Wesleyan, made remarks at the Writing Conference. Bloom is the author of three novels, three collections of short stories, a children’s book, and an essay collection. She has been a nominee for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Guest faculty member Salvatore Scibona spoke about novel and short story writing. His short stories have been published in Threepenny Review, Best New American Voices 2004, The Pushcart Book of Short Stories: The Best Stories from a Quarter-Century of the Pushcart Prize, A Public Space, D di la Repubblica, Satisfaction, the New York Times, and The New Yorker.

Guest faculty member Salvatore Scibona spoke about novel and short story writing. His short stories have been published in Threepenny Review, Best New American Voices 2004, The Pushcart Book of Short Stories: The Best Stories from a Quarter-Century of the Pushcart Prize, A Public Space, D di la Repubblica, Satisfaction, The New York Times and The New Yorker.

Guest faculty member Lis Harris, a journalist and author, spoke about literary journalism and memoir. Harris was a staff worker on The New Yorker for 25 years, and her work has appeared in The New York Times, The World Policy Journal, and the Wilson Quarterly.

Guest faculty member Lis Harris, a journalist and author, spoke about literary journalism and memoir. Harris was a staff worker on The New Yorker for 25 years, and her work has appeared in The New York Times, The World Policy Journal, and the Wilson Quarterly.

Participants are welcome to ask questions throughout the Writers Conference.

Participants are welcome to ask questions throughout the Writers Conference.

Guest faculty member and poet Honor Moore is the author of three poetry collections: Red Shoes, Darling, and Memoir and two memoirs: The White Blackbird: A Life of the Painter Margaret Sargent by Her Granddaughter and The Bishop's Daughter, named an Editor's Choice by The New York Times, a "Favorite Book of 2008" by the Los Angeles Times, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Guest faculty member and poet Honor Moore is the author of three poetry collections: Red Shoes, Darling, and Memoir and two memoirs: The White Blackbird: A Life of the Painter Margaret Sargent by Her Granddaughter and The Bishop’s Daughter, named an Editor’s Choice by The New York Times, a “Favorite Book of 2008” by the Los Angeles Times, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

On June 18, William Finnegan spoke to conference participants about writing about social and political issues. Finnegan’s new book Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography.

On June 18, William Finnegan spoke to conference participants about writing about social and political issues. Finnegan’s new book Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography.

Finnegan has been a contributor to The New Yorker since 1984 and a staff writer since 1987. Reporting from Africa, Central America, South America, Europe, the Balkans, and Australia, as well as from the United States, he has twice received the John Bartlow MArtin Award for Public Interest Magazine Journalism and twice been a National Magazine Award finalist.

Finnegan has been a contributor to The New Yorker since 1984 and a staff writer since 1987. Reporting from Africa, Central America, South America, Europe, the Balkans, and Australia, as well as from the United States, he has twice received the John Bartlow MArtin Award for Public Interest Magazine Journalism and twice been a National Magazine Award finalist.

Finnegan spoke to Wesleyan Writers Conference participants and signed copies of his book.

Finnegan spoke to Wesleyan Writers Conference participants and signed copies of his book.

Additional photos of the Wesleyan Writers Conference are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake and Tom Dzimian)

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Wesleyan’s Campus Boasts Natural Landscapes, Meadows, Wildflowers

Wesleyan’s campus is home to 89 acres of natural areas. These meadow areas are only mowed once a year and are home to wildflowers, native grasses and provide food and homes for wildlife. As part of the Wesleyan Sustainability Grounds Initiatives, the university is in the process of expanding no-mow areas across campus.

Hundreds of lupines grow in a meadow near Physical Plant on Long Lane. Hundreds of lupines grow in a meadow near Physical Plant on Long Lane.

Hundreds of lupines grow in a meadow near Physical Plant on Long Lane.

Land behind Wesleyan University Press on Long Lane is left natural.

Land behind Wesleyan University Press on Long Lane is left natural.

The student organization WILD Wes (Working for Intelligent Landscape Design at Wesleyan), created WILD WestCo, a .75 acre sustainable landscaping initiative in the West College Courtyard. WILD Wes developed a landscape design and implementation plan following a permacultural ethic.

The student organization WILD Wes (Working for Intelligent Landscape Design at Wesleyan), created WILD WestCo, a .75 acre sustainable landscaping initiative in the West College Courtyard. WILD Wes developed a landscape design and implementation plan following a permacultural ethic.

The West College courtyard is home to more than 40 shrubs, dozens of fruit trees, two rain gardens, a rainwater catchment system, multiple wood chip pathways lined in rye, clover and buckwheat, a seating area, compost area and hundreds of perennials that draw birds, insects and other wildlife.

The West College courtyard is home to more than 40 shrubs, dozens of fruit trees, two rain gardens, a rainwater catchment system, multiple wood chip pathways lined in rye, clover and buckwheat, a seating area, compost area and hundreds of perennials that draw birds, insects and other wildlife.

Wesleyan's cross country trails pass through a wooded area and this grassy field.

Wesleyan’s cross country trails pass through a wooded area and this grassy field rich with clover.

Buttercups bloom in a natural area between Physical Plant and the Freeman Athletic Center.

Buttercups bloom in a natural area between Physical Plant and the Freeman Athletic Center. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

Morgan Speaks on Laser-Induced Breakdowns at Plasma Physics Conference

Tom Morgan

Tom Morgan

Tom Morgan, Foss Professor of Physics, recently attended the 43rd Institute of Physics U.K. Plasma Physics Conference in Isle of Skye, Scotland. He presented a flash verbal presentation and a poster contribution dealing with the properties of water following focused laser induced breakdown.

After a plasma (a gas of ions and free electrons) is formed in water by laser breakdown, the energy is dissipated through light emission, shockwaves and cavitation bubbles. When the breakdown is close to the surface of the water, surface waves and water ejection from the surface up to heights of 60 cm also occur.

All of these phenomena have been observed in the laboratory at Wesleyan in conjunction with Lutz Huwel, professor of physics, Matt Mei ’18, and international collaborators. Joining the effort from abroad are Professor Tomoyuki Murakami, Seikei University, Tokyo, and Professor Bill Graham, Queen’s University, N. Ireland.

New effects not seen before have been observed, particularly near the surface at the air-water interface. The air-water interface is ubiquitous with applications to biology, environmental studies, chemical analysis and medicine, but its detailed behavior under different conditions is not well understood. The research uses both state of the art computer simulation and experimentation to elucidate the evolutionary dynamics and structure of bulk water and the air-water interface.

“Since the meeting was in Scotland, the researchers though it appropriate to try a liquid other than water and results were reported on whiskey as well,” Morgan said.

CASE Honors Wesleyan’s Hamilton Fundraising Event with Gold Award

More than 1,300 members of the Wesleyan community attended the "Hamilton Event on Broadway" on Oct. 2, 2015.

More than 1,300 members of the Wesleyan community attended the “Wesleyan Hamilton Evening on Broadway” on Oct. 2, 2015.

After the performance, attendees, leadership donors and volunteers moved to the 1831 Society Reception at the Edison Ballroom. (Photos by Robert Adam Mayer)

After the performance, attendees, leadership donors and volunteers moved to the 1831 Society Reception at the Edison Ballroom. (Photos by Robert Adam Mayer)

The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) recently honored Wesleyan University with a Circle of Excellence Gold Award in the Single-Day Special Events category. The Office of University Relations and the Office of University Communications collaborated on the prize-winning event, “Wesleyan Hamilton Evening on Broadway,” which included a benefit performance and after-party.

On Oct. 2, 2015, more than 1,300 members of the Wesleyan community descended on the Richard Rodgers Theatre in New York City as Wesleyan hosted a sold-out performance of Hamilton, written by and starring Lin-Manuel Miranda ’02, Hon. ’15 and directed by Thomas Kail ‘99.

The evening was sponsored by Wesleyan parents and was held in conjunction with Wesleyan’s THIS IS WHY Campaign, which ends June 30. Through additional sponsorships and ticket sales, “Wesleyan Hamilton Evening on Broadway” raised more than $1.6 million for financial aid.

CASE’s Circle of Excellence Awards Program enables institutions to gain recognition, benchmark excellence, be judged by peers in higher education, and strengthen on-campus credibility.

View a photo gallery of the special “Wesleyan Hamilton Evening on Broadway” here.

Classes in Drawing, Biology, Programming, Writing Currently Offered during Wesleyan’s Summer Session

During Wesleyan’s Summer Session, students complete semester-long courses in only five weeks.

This summer, classes are being offered in drawing, biology, chemistry, computer programming, legal thinking, writing creative nonfiction, foreign policy, the art of the personal essay, the narrative, techniques of fiction, and international politics. All courses have limited enrollment, preserving the small seminar style and opportunity for close relationships with faculty and fellow students.

Summer Session I runs May 25 to June 23, and Session II takes place June 28 to July 28.

Pictured below is ARST131, Drawing I, taught by Kate TenEyck, assistant professor of art:

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Staff on the Move May 2016

The Office of Human Resources announces the following hires and departures for May 2016:

Newly hired
Zijia Guo was hired as prospect research analyst in University Relations on May 2
Philip Huntington was hired as electrician in Physical Plant on May 2
Noah Barth was hired as program manager in the Center for Prison Education on May 4
Amber Jones ’09 was hired as psychotherapist in the Counseling Center on May 9
Diane Widger was hired as Peoplesoft analyst programmer on May 18
Scott Shea was hired as assistant director of Wesleyan events and conferences on May 31

Departures
Kaiser Aslam, University Muslim Chaplain, Religious and Spiritual Life
Anya Backlund ’11, exhibitions coordinator for the Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance
Charlotte Freeland, research assistant/lab coordinator, psychology
Aditi Kini ’12, assistant director, online communications for University Relations
Zachariah Pfeifer, coordinator of Greek Life
Meredith Nyser, swimming and diving intern

Faculty, Staff Celebrate End of the Semester at Ice Cream Social

On June 1, the Office of Human Resources hosted an Ice Cream Social for faculty, staff and employed students on Andrus Field and the Huss Courtyard.

On June 1, the Office of Human Resources hosted an Ice Cream Social for faculty, staff and employed students on Andrus Field and the Huss Courtyard. The gathering provided an opportunity for employees to mingle and celebrate the end of spring semester.

Rhonda York, administrative assistant in the Art and Art History Department, adds an array of toppings to her ice cream.

Rhonda York, administrative assistant in the Art and Art History Department, adds an array of toppings to her ice cream.

Chris Cruz, manager of fire safety and facilities, enjoys the social with her son, Colin.

Chris Cruz, manager of fire safety and facilities, enjoys the social with her son, Colin.

Mario Torres, material handler in Physical Plant, served as the gathering's DJ.

Mario Torres, material handler in Physical Plant, served as the gathering’s DJ.

After enjoying ice cream, several faculty and staff played volleyball, steel drums, participated in a water balloon and bean bag toss and created tie-dye T-shirts. (Photos by Olivia Drake)

After enjoying ice cream, several faculty and staff played volleyball, steel drums, participated in a water balloon and bean bag toss and created tie-dye T-shirts.

Rudensky’s (’01) Photographs Exhibited in New York City Gallery

Sasha RudenskyPhotography by Sasha Rudensky ’01, assistant professor of art, is featured in an exhibition titled “Tinsel and Blue” from June 8 to July 16 at the Sasha Wolf Gallery, 70 Orchard Street, New York, N.Y.

Rudensky is a Russian-born artist whose work has been exhibited widely including at the Musee de l’Elysee in Lausanne, Switzerland; Fries Museum in Leewarden, Netherlands; Macro Testaccio Museum in Rome, Italy; ArtScience Museum in Singapore; and Danziger Projects in New York. In 2010, Rudensky’s work was included in “reGeneration 2: Photographers of Tomorrow Today,” an international survey of emerging photographers. Her work is held in a number of public collections including Musee de l’Elysee, Yale Art Gallery, and Center of Creative Photography in Tuscon, among others.

Rudensky received her MFA from Yale University School of Art in 2008 and BA from Wesleyan in 2001. She was the recipient of the Ward Cheney Memorial Award from Yale University, Mortimer-Hays Brandeis Traveling Fellowship, Leica/Jim Marshall Award, and Jessup Prize from Wesleyan. In 2013, Rudensky was awarded the Aaron Siskind Individual Fellowship grant. Her work has appeared in New York Times Magazine, Der Spiegel, Cicero Magazine, American Photo, PDN and others. She is currently head of the photography program at Wesleyan.

Sasha Rudensky

Sasha Rudensky at “Tinsel and Blue,” June 8. (Photo by Cynthia Rockwell)