Olivia Drake

Olivia (M.A.L.S. '08) is editor of the Wesleyan Connection newsletter and campus photographer. I have two dogs, five chickens and 30 house plants. I like snow, photographing firemen and enjoying "stinky" cheeses. Send me your story ideas to newsletter@wesleyan.edu.

Wesleyan Orchestra Performs for Local Children

On. Feb. 28, the Wesleyan University Orchestra performed "CATcerto and Musical Beasts" for area children.

On. Feb. 28, the Wesleyan University Orchestra performed “CATcerto and Musical Beasts” for area children.

Cummings, McQueeney Honored with Cardinal Achievement Awards

#THISISWHY

Linda Cummings, administrative assistant in the Sociology Department and for the Public Affairs Center, was recently presented with a Cardinal Achievement Award for her efforts in taking on the responsibility of cleaning the PAC basement storage rooms. These large rooms were so full of old furniture, papers, books and assorted other items that it was almost impossible to enter them. Cummings worked with Physical Plant to arrange for multiple rounds of removal of usable furniture, assisted current and emerti faculty with review of their stored materials, arranged with the university archivist to remove historical files of interest to the university, and arranged with the shredding contractor to make special pickups of sensitive material. This process took four months to complete.

“We now have clean usable storage space for short-term and medium-term faculty projects. This was a challenging and complicated special project, and Linda took initiative at numerous points to make sure the process moved forward. In addition, she was always cheerful and helpful during the process,” said Joyce Jacobsen, the Andrews Professor of Economics and dean of the Social Sciences and director of global initiatives.

Kris McQueeney, administrative assistant in the Government Department, was recently presented with a Cardinal Achievement Award for assisting three professors with a complicated office move. McQueeney took it upon herself to reconfigure the office space to accommodate three workstations in one office which included space for storing the books and papers for each of the professors. She worked out how to reconfigure the phones and computer lines and drew up a careful floor plan so as to be able to fit all three into one space.

“Thanks to Kris’s careful management of the process, the move was completed in a timely manner,” Jacobsen said.

McQueeney also monitored the storage space situation in the PAC basement areas that the Government Department had traditionally controlled, and took good advantage of the larger basement cleaning project this fall so as to clear out excess furniture in these rooms as well.

“Kris is always hardworking and efficient and I appreciate her willingness to pitch in and take responsibility to make sure challenging projects that require much coordination are completed on schedule,” Jacobsen said.

This special honor comes with a $250 award and reflects the university’s gratitude for those extra efforts. Award recipients are nominated by department chairs and supervisors.

Nominations can be made anytime throughout the year. For more information or to nominate a staff member for the award, visit the Cardinal Achievement Award website. Recipients will continue to be recognized in News @ Wesleyan. See past Cardinal Achievement Award recipients here.

Indonesian Dancers Perform, Lead Workshop with Green Street TLC Students

Tari Aceh! performers worked with students at the Green Street Arts Center Feb. 25.

Tari Aceh! performers worked with students at the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center Feb. 25.

On Feb. 5, the Green Street Teaching and Learning Center hosted dancers from the Connecticut premier of Tari Aceh! (Dance Aceh!). The performance features a group of nine female performers from Aceh, Indonesia on their first-ever tour of the United States. Their dances, inherited from their ancestors, are stunning in their synchronicity and include rhythmic body percussion and the singing of both Islamic liturgical and folk texts, accompanied by percussion. The dancers are between the ages of 14 and 24, and study at Syiah Kuala University, located in Banda Aceh, the capital of the Aceh province on the western Indonesian island of Sumatra.

Green Street held a workshop with the Acehnese dancers for its AfterSchool students. The workshop exposed them to a similar dance from another culture. Afterwards, the Green Street TLC Hip Hop students taught the Indonesian dancers their own dance routine.

A supporter of Green Street TLC, the Center for the Arts regularly includes visiting artists in programming for the AfterSchool program.

A video and photos of the program are below: (Photos by Hannah Norman ’16)

YouTube Preview Image

F00A6450

Shinohara’s Solo Exhibitions to be Displayed in Japan

keijiMaster printmaker Keiji Shinohara, artist in residence, will have three solo exhibitions in 2015.” The title is “Keiji Shinohara: Woodcut.”

The first will be at the Odakyu Shinjuku Art Salon in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan March 11-17. For more information call 03-3342-1111 (Japan).

The second show will be at Art Zone-Kaguraoka in Kyoto, Japan May 9-May 25. For more information call o75-754-0155 (Japan).

The exhibition will return to the United States and be on display at the Visual Arts Gallery at Roger Williams University in Bristol, R.I. throughout the month of October.

In addition, Shinohara will be demonstrating Japanese Ukiyo-e printmaking and techniques at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston from noon to 3 p.m. April 6 and April 19. He’ll also lead a workshop at the Penland School of Crafts in Penland, N.C. Aug. 9-21.

Shinohara teaches in the Art and Art History Department and the College of East Asian Studies. While living in Kyoto, he trained for 10 years in the traditional Japanese woodblock printing style known as Ukiyo-e.  The technical foundation for his artwork is rooted in that training, accompanied by techniques of contemporary western printmaking, yet the imagery itself is very different from historical Ukiyo-e.

According to Shinohara’s artist statement, “the story behind the work is very important; there is a sense of narrative that is very private. The feelings and emotions that I convey through these abstract landscapes matter most to me. Almost always my images are of nature, but it is the essence of the landscape that I want to express, not realistic accuracy.”

Mlozanowski Author of Night Flying

Night Flying

Night Flying

Joy Mlozanowski, library assistant/accounting specialist, is the author of Night Flying, published by Port Yonder Press in January 2015.

Abstract: In her diary, Mae questions God as she and her husband confront the news of an abnormal pregnancy and agonize over the decisions they face. Needing time away to think, she visits her childhood home and reconnects with Will, a deaf friend who taught her to sign when they were young. After her visit, Mae and Will continue an intimate written exchange in which she confides her despair, while Will shares his own struggle to honor the wishes of his dying father, and reconcile his mother’s reluctance to let go.

This collection of correspondences between Mae and Will form a powerful, nonjudgmental narrative around faith and the controversial topics of abortion and end-of-life care. Their story is one of understanding and hope, and promises to deeply touch anyone who has faced these difficult and heartbreaking choices.

Mlozanowski has an MFA from Southern Connecticut State University, and also is a visual artist and the assistant editor for Pith Journal. Read more: www.joychristine.com

President Roth Fields Questions from WesMaSS Scholars

Wesleyan President Michael Roth met with WesMaSS (Wesleyan Physical Sciences and Mathematics Scholars Program) students Feb. 20 in Exley Science Center. WesMaSS is a two-year program that begins the summer immediately prior to a student’s first year at Wesleyan.

Wesleyan President Michael Roth met with WesMaSS (Wesleyan Physical Sciences and Mathematics Scholars Program) students Feb. 20 in Exley Science Center. WesMaSS is a two-year program that begins the summer immediately prior to a student’s first year at Wesleyan.

Wesleyan Writers Conference Offering Scholarships, Fellowships

Wesleyan is hosting the 59th annual Wesleyan Writers Conference June 10-14.

Wesleyan is hosting the 59th annual Wesleyan Writers Conference June 10-14.

Registration is open for the 59th Annual Wesleyan Writers Conference. This year, the conference is offering scholarships and fellowships for alumni and other members of the Wesleyan community, including six scholarships for undergraduates.

The conference, held June 10-14, welcomes established writers, new writers, and everyone interested in the writer’s craft, and features seminars, workshops, readings and manuscript consultations.

Sessions include novel, short story, poetry, nonfiction, journalism and special sessions such as writing about science and medicine.

“This is a wonderful opportunity to start a new project or develop your current work with the help of distinguished writers, editors, agents and publishers,” said Anne Greene, director of the Wesleyan Writers Conference.

Faculty include Amy Bloom, Roxana Robinson, Alexander Chee, and William Finnegan of The New Yorker, as well as many others. To register, or apply for a scholarship, visit the conference website.

CFCD Hosts Contemplative Pedagogy Workshop

About 20 faculty, staff and graduate students participated in a contemplative pedagogy workshop and discussion Feb. 19 in the Allbritton Center. The workshop, titled “Practically impractical: Contemplative practices in the classroom – A Faculty and Graduate Student Teaching Workshop” was taught by Michelle Francl, professor of chemistry on the Clowes Fund for Science and Public Safety at Bryn Mawr College.

Read more about the workshop here.

Photos of the workshops are below: (Photos by Olivia Drake and Aviva Hirsch ’16)

lec_pedagogy_2015-0219121835

Resor, Seixas ’10 Co-Author Paper on Structural Mapping of Hualapai Limestone

Phil Resor, associate professor of earth and environmental sciences, and Gus Seixas ’10 are co-authors of “Constraints on the evolution of vertical deformation and Colorado River incision near eastern Lake Mead, Arizona, provided by quantitative structural mapping of the Hualapai Limestone,” published in the February 2015 issue of Geosphere, Vol. 11, pages 31-49. The paper includes research from Seixas’s honors thesis at Wesleyan.

In this study, the authors quantify the structural geometry of Hualapai Limestone, which was deposited in a series of basins that lie in the path of the Colorado River. The limestone was deformed by by a fault pair known as the Wheeler and Lost Basin Range faults.

Grossman Talks about Quantitative Easing Policy on Share Radio

Richard Grossman

Richard Grossman

Richard Grossman, professor of economics, is featured in a radio interview with Share Radio in London Feb. 19.

In the interview, Grossman talks about the consequences of the European Central Bank’s new quantitative easing (QE) policy, which may stimulate an economy when a standard monetary policy has become ineffective.

The ECB’s action follows in the footsteps of the central banks of Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States, which also have used quantitative easing in the 2000s.

A concern that has been raised about the introduction of QE is that persistent low interest rates will lead to another boom-bust macroeconomic cycle similar to the one that ended  in the US subprime crisis. Grossman, who conducts research on historical episodes of financial crises, argues that the European economy is so weak at the moment that the risk of QE causing a crisis is low, and certainly outweighed by the benefits.

Grossman said implementation of the QE may not be noticed right away.

“Over time, this will put a consistent downward pressure on the euro,” which Grossman argues will help European exporters.

Listen to the program here.

Craighead Co-Authors Paper on Account Reversals in Developing and Industrialized Countries

Bill Craighead, assistant professor of economics, is the co-author of “Current Account Reversals and Structural Change in Developing and Industrialized Countries,” published in the February issue of The Journal of International Trade and Economic Development.

The paper compares the experience of high-income and developing countries in adjusting current account deficits, which measure how much they are relying on external borrowing. In both types of country, construction is the most sensitive sector to the current account. On average, adjustments in developing countries are more severe, but that is mainly due to the effects of currency crises. When you take those out, they look more similar. Employment effects in developing countries are less relative to the changes in output, which may reflect differing labor market institutions.

Craighead credits Lisa Lee ’13 for providing her “outstanding research assistance” while writing the paper. Lee worked on the research in 2011 while participating in the Quantitative Analysis Center’s summer program.

Post Delivers 24th Annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression

Robert Post, dean and Sol & Lillian Goldman Professor of Law at Yale Law School, delivered the 24th Annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression Feb. 19 in Memorial Chapel.

Robert Post, dean and Sol & Lillian Goldman Professor of Law at Yale Law School, delivered the 24th Annual Hugo L. Black Lecture on Freedom of Expression Feb. 19 in Memorial Chapel. His talk was titled “The First Amendment, Knowledge, and Academic Freedom.”

The lecture is named in honor of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice and endowed by Leonard S. Halpert, Esq., ’44.

The lecture is named in honor of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice and endowed by Leonard S. Halpert, Esq., ’44.